Bounty hunter pleads guilty in home invasion

Occupants held for hours, robbed in their apartment

March 18, 2003|BY A SUN STAFF WRITER

One of two bounty hunters accused of bursting into an Ellicott City apartment, robbing the residents and holding them against their will for 2 1/2 hours has pleaded guilty to common law robbery and false imprisonment charges.

Darnell Anthony Brown, 30, of the 2600 block of Hampden Ave. in Baltimore entered pleas Friday to six of the 20 charges filed against him and was sentenced to the time he served in jail - just more than six months - awaiting trial in another case that was later dropped.

Judge Diane O. Leasure suspended all but 194 days of a five-year sentence and gave Brown two years' supervised probation. Brown also was ordered to pay $505 restitution to three victims.

Despite his guilty plea, Brown, who aspires to be a bail bondsman, "still maintains ... he didn't take a dime," his attorney, George Psoras Jr., told Leasure on Friday.

Brown told investigators that he and another bounty hunter went to an apartment in the 8700 block of Town and Country Lane on Dec. 19, 2001, looking for two bail jumpers bonded through Baltimore-based Prestige Bail Bonds, according to prosecutors.

One victim said Brown and the other man, Everett Ambush Chambers, pointed guns at her and then rounded up the four other people in the apartment and held them in the living room. Brown and Chambers are accused of ransacking the apartment and stealing money, according to a statement read into the record by Assistant State's Attorney Lynn Marshall.

The two men later took one woman with them to the Wilkens precinct in Baltimore County but released her without taking her inside, authorities said.

Brown believed the woman was one of two "skips" he was looking for but let her go because he and Chambers did not have a document they needed to turn her in, Psoras said.

Chambers, 27, is scheduled to go on trial May 28.

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