Deaths Elsewhere

Deaths Elsewhere

January 14, 2003

C. Douglas Dillon, 93, a Wall Street investment banker and diplomat who served as secretary of the treasury in the Kennedy and Johnson administrations, died Friday in New York after being hospitalized for several weeks with an infection.

Mr. Dillon was picked by President-elect John F. Kennedy to head the Treasury Department after six years as U.S. ambassador to France and nearly two years as undersecretary of state for economic affairs under President Dwight D. Eisenhower.

As an original member of President Kennedy's Cabinet, he was one of its two high-profile Republicans -with Defense Secretary Robert S. McNamara - surrounded by Democrats. He also was among the Cabinet officers who stayed at the behest of President Lyndon B. Johnson after President Kennedy's assassination in November 1963. He returned to private life in 1965.

Under both presidents he led the Alliance for Progress, a program to spur economic development in Latin America, an effort he had earlier directed as a founder of the Inter-American Development Bank.

Known as a staunch advocate of free trade, Mr. Dillon as Treasury secretary from 1961 to 1965 developed policies aimed at reducing the U.S. trade deficit by controlling inflation and expanding exports, and backed U.S. cooperation with the European Common Market.

He also strongly advocated a large tax cut program to spur economic growth. The tax measure was pending at the time of President Kennedy's death, and Mr. Dillon won President Johnson's support for its passage by Congress in 1964.

Richard W. "Dick" Simmons, 89, an actor whose 40-year career in Hollywood included the title role in the 1950s television series Sergeant Preston of the Yukon, died Saturday in Oceanside, Calif.

Born in St. Paul, Minn., Mr. Simmons moved to Los Angeles in the late 1930s. He became a contract player for MGM studios and appeared in a number of films, beginning in 1937 with A Million to One, which starred Joan Fontaine. Other credits included Angels in the Outfield in 1951, The Three Musketeers in 1948, and Lady in the Lake in 1947.

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