Two Baltimore teens charged in killing of unlicensed cabdriver

October 29, 2002|By Laurie Willis | Laurie Willis,SUN STAFF

Two Baltimore teen-agers face a preliminary hearing next month in the killing of an unlicensed cabdriver, in another incident of violence against hacks in Baltimore. The two, both 17 years old, are also charged in a carjacking in which the driver was threatened with a gun.

Timothy Maurice Lewis of the 2400 block of Winchester St. and Fearless Oral Morrison of the 3000 block of N. Rosedale Court are scheduled for a Nov. 20 hearing. They were arrested last week and charged with first-degree murder, first-degree assault and related handgun crimes.

Lewis and Morrison are accused of killing David Hammond, 35, of the 3600 block of Copley Road on Sept. 23.

Last week, Javas Hall, 21, was sentenced to three life terms in U.S. District Court in Baltimore for three carjacking murders a year ago. Three unlicensed cab drivers -Matthew Kenney, 29, Kajali Samateh, 40, and Tony Rogers, 31 - were killed with single gunshots to the chest.

According to a statement of charges prepared by homicide Detective Corey Alston:

Lewis and Morrison flagged down a hack near North Avenue and Rosedale Street the night of Sept. 22. About 1:25 a.m., in the 4800 block of Lindsay Road, Morrison pointed a gun at Hammond and ordered him out of the car. As Morrison walked around to the driver's side, Hammond jumped back into the car and drove off, with Lewis inside.

Several shots were fired into the car. Hammond was struck once in the upper right side.

The assailants fled on foot. Hammond was taken to Maryland Shock Trauma Center, where he was pronounced dead.

The men have also been charged in a carjacking Sept. 16. Police said a man who lives on South Woodington Road was in the 800 block of Cooks Lane when another man, later identified as Morrison, pointed a handgun at the victim's head and ordered him to "get out of the car and run, or else."

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