Deaths Elsewhere

Deaths Elsewhere

October 20, 2002

Nikolai Rukavishnikov, 70, a cosmonaut who in three trips into outer space for the former Soviet Union encountered major problems twice, died yesterday in Moscow of an apparent heart attack, Russian news media reported.

Mr. Rukavishnikov's first space voyage was in 1971 aboard the Soyuz 10, which was to have delivered the first humans to the orbiting Salyut-1 space station. The craft docked with the station, but the crew was unable to gain access, reportedly because of a faulty hatch, and the mission was aborted.In 1974, he made his next flight aboard the Soyuz 16, staying in space for nearly six days in a mission that was part of the U.S.-Soviet Apollo-Soyuz Test Project.

His last mission was Soyuz 33 in 1979. The craft was to dock with the Salyut-6 station, but an engine failure left it unable to maneuver. The same engine was to have sent the spacecraft back to Earth. Mr. Rukavishnikov was able to fire up a backup engine, which also didn't work properly, but was sufficient to return him and Bulgarian comrade Georgi Ivanov safely. The ITAR-Tass news agency said this was the first time a spacecraft had been landed under manual control.

Abe Most, 82, a swing clarinetist known for his work with the Les Brown and Tommy Dorsey bands in the 1940s and '50s, died Oct. 10 of heart failure at Kaiser Hospital in Los Angeles, according to his wife, Gussie.

Born in New York City, Mr. Most began playing the clarinet at the age of 9. In 1939, he joined the Les Brown Orchestra for a two-year stint playing alto saxophone and singing.

Most served in the Army Air Forces during World War II and was stationed in Southern California. After the war, he settled in the Los Angeles area, worked with his own group and with the Tommy Dorsey orchestra.

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