The Dish

THE DISH

October 16, 2002|By Liz Atwood | Liz Atwood,SUN STAFF

CLARIFICATION:

We recently wrote about an article in Consumer Reports on Health that cited the benefits of tea. The phone number we provided is to subscribe to the newsletter. To see the tea report, visit www.consumerreports.org/health.

Tea drinkers: a toast to their health

Perhaps the British and Chinese are on to something. Recent studies have found that drinking tea - black or green, cold or hot - may have health benefits that include stronger bones, improved arteries and healthier hearts, according to Consumer Reports on Health.

The newsletter from the Consumer Union cites intriguing studies into the relationship between health and tea drinking. One Dutch study found that tea drinkers had a lower risk of fatal heart attacks than nontea drinkers. A Chinese study found that people over 30 who had been drinking tea for six to 10 years had a higher bone density in the spine than those who didn't drink tea.

For a copy of the report, call 800-765-1845.

Chipping away at snacks' fat

Frito-Lay has announced that it will make its chips more healthful. The company said it will eliminate trans-fat from its Doritos, Tostitos and Cheetos and introduce reduced-fat chips and Cheetos in the coming months.

The snack company says that next year it will start making its corn chips with corn oil, which doesn't contain trans-fat. Trans-fat has been linked to bad cholesterol and heart disease. Frito-Lay has used transfat-free oils for years in its Lay's and Ruffles potato chips.

The new reduced-fat Lay's potato chips, which will be available in December, will have 60 percent less saturated fat than the regular chips. The reduced-fat Cheetos will be on the market early next year and will have 70 percent less saturated fat than the regular Cheetos.

First dinner, then the opera

This season, the Baltimore Opera Company is tempting the taste buds as well as the eyes and ears of opera lovers. The company has teamed up with area restaurants to offer opera-themed dinners before performances and shuttle service from the restaurants to the Lyric Opera House.

The evenings include dinners at Sotto Sopra before performances of Rigoletto in November, dinners at the Brewer's Art before Die Fledermaus in December, dinner at the New York Palace before Lady Macbeth of the Mtsensk in February and March, and dinner at Ixia before performances of Madama Butterfly in May and June.

The cost ranges from $100 to $125. For details and reservations, call the Baltimore Opera Company box office, 410-727-6000.

Oiled and ready

Why didn't someone think of this before? Lodge Logic, a Tennessee company that has been making cast-iron cookware for 106 years, has come up with seasoned cookware that is ready to use, right out of the box.

The company has developed a technique of spraying vegetable oil onto its cast-iron cookware and heating it to high temperatures in gas ovens.

The pans are sold in department stores, kitchen shops and by gourmet retailers. Prices range from $11 for an 8-inch skillet to about $60 for larger pieces.

Events

The Baltimore chapter of the American Institute of Food and Wine will hold a dinner and auction from 6 p.m. to 10 p.m. Oct. 25 at Richard Opfer Auctioneering, 1919 Greenspring Drive, Lutherville. A buffet will be catered by Chef's Expressions. Items being auctioned include wines, food, cookbooks and items from Julia Child's kitchen. $35 per person. Reservations required. Call 410-244-0044.

Linganore Winecellers will hold its annual Vintage Jazz Wine Festival from noon to 6 p.m. Saturday and Sunday at the vineyard at 13601 Glissans Mill Road in Mount Airy. Adult admission is $8 and includes winery tour and tasting. Call 410-795-6432.

Taste southern Rhone wines 6 p.m. Oct. 24 at Bin 604, 604 S. Exeter St. $35 in advance, $45 at the door. Call 410-576-0444.

Taste sweet and savory fondue and pumpkin cookies from 4:30 p.m. to 7 p.m. tomorrow at Eddie's of Roland Park, 6213 N. Charles St. Call 410-377-8040.

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