Fund-raiser selected to lead Jewish charity

Terrill will assume helm of The Associated in July

September 28, 2002|By Dennis O'Brien | Dennis O'Brien,SUN STAFF

A 41-year-old executive with The Associated: Jewish Community Federation of Baltimore has been tapped to become president of the well-known charity.

Marc B. Terrill, the executive vice president since 1998, was appointed president-elect yesterday. He will become president July 1 next year, replacing Darrell Friedman, 59, who announced in June that he planned to retire.

"I'm thrilled," Terrill said.

Friedman's 16-year tenure saw the charity's annual fund-raising campaign grow from $18.9 million to $29.3 million and included the opening of a $3.5 million addition to The Associated's headquarters on Mount Royal Avenue in 2000.

Terrill pledged to continue Friedman's efforts to develop partnerships with community leaders to resolve issues affecting the region.

But he said The Associated and other area charities face a number of challenges, including a tight economy and crafting solutions to the area's social ills.

"I don't think it's just going to be the economy. I think it's going to be the potential for apathy and the potential lack of imagination in how we address the issues we have to face" he said.

The Associated raises almost $30 million annually, placing it third among major Jewish federations in the United States for per capita giving, according to United Jewish Committees, its parent organization.

The 80-year-old charity includes nearly 40 agencies, including Jewish Family Services and Hillel of Greater Baltimore.

Terrill was born in Cleveland, raised in Miami and lives in Owings Mills with his wife and three children.

He earned a bachelor's degree in psychology from the University of Florida in 1984 and a master's in social work from Yeshiva University in New York in 1988.

He joined The Associated in 1989, but left in 1996 to become a vice president at the Combined Jewish Philanthropies of Boston.

He returned to The Associated in 1998 to accept his current position as executive vice president.

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