The Dish

THE DISH

September 04, 2002

Here's to honey

When you pick that perfect apple from a tree or your supermarket produce section, pause for a moment to remember the honeybee that made it possible. Bees pollinate apples and most of our other crops and give us more than 300 kinds of honey, according to the National Honey Board.

Here's a Honey Spiced Cider that brings out the best of fall flavors: Combine 5 cups of apple cider and 3/4 cup honey in a saucepan and stir over medium heat until the honey dissolves. Slice two small navel oranges into quarters and push three whole cloves into the rind of each slice. Add the slices to the cider along with 7 cinnamon sticks, a 4-inch strip of lemon zest and 1/4 teaspoon grated nutmeg. Simmer on low heat, covered, for 20 minutes. Remove fruit and spices and serve hot. Makes 8 servings.

Panning a space problem

If you're tired of the irritating clatter of pots and pans that don't fit in your cabinets and take up too much room in the dishwasher, Italian cookware maker Bialetti has a solution. The company has introduced a nine-piece cookware set that features folding handles that allow the pans to fit snugly into cupboards, dishwashers and plate racks. The aluminum pots and pans in the Spazio collection have an anti-slip base and nonstick coating.

The set is available at Kohl's department stores at a suggested retail price of about $50. For more information, call 800-421-6290.

Chefs share their secrets

Some of the best chefs in America reveal the secrets behind their creations in a new quarterly magazine, Great Chefs.

The magazine is produced by the makers of the Great Chefs television show that airs on the Discovery Channel and on public television stations. The premier issue includes recipes from Marcel Desaulniers, owner of the Trellis restaurant in Williamsburg, Va.; Michel Richard, owner of Citronelle in Washington, D.C.; and Thomas Aikens, personal chef for Andrew Lloyd Webber. The magazine is available at newsstands and bookstores for a suggested price of $5.95.

Broccoli and breast cancer

Broccoli prevents breast cancer. Yeast protects against anthrax. Honey fights cholesterol. These aren't headlines in a tabloid newspaper, but news to come from the national meeting of the American Chemical Society, an organization of chemists and chemical engineers.

Scientists at the recent conference described a number of studies in which foods might be used to treat common diseases. One found that an anti-cancer agent present in broccoli seemed to fight breast cancer in animals. Another found that a compound from baker's yeast significantly increased the survival rate of mice infected with lethal anthrax spores. And another study found that honey contains about the same level of plaque-fighting antioxidants as leafy green vegetables.

To read more about the research, visit the group's Web site at www.chemistry.org.

Events

Nine of the country's 62 certified master chefs and certified master pastry chefs will come together to celebrate the 19th anniversary of Rudys' 2900 in Finksburg with a seven-course dinner at the restaurant 6:30 p.m. Monday. Cost of the meal, including champagne and wines, is $185. Seating is limited. Call 410-833-5777 to make reservations.

Amateur winemakers are invited to enter their creations at the Maryland Wine Festival's Amateur Wine Judging Competition Sunday, Sept. 22. Wines will be judged on appearance, aroma and bouquet, taste balance and aftertaste. To preregister, call the Carroll County Farm Museum at 410-848-7775 or e-mail ccfarm@carr.org.

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