Potato-chip cookies favored by family, friends

RECIPE FINDER

May 22, 2002|By Ellen Hawks | Ellen Hawks,SUN STAFF

Sue Schatz of Abingdon requested a potato-chip-cookie recipe.

Claramarie Trombetta of Timonium responded.

She wrote that the recipe has been a favorite of her family and friends for many years, and she hoped it would be for Sue.

Recipe requests

Michelle Lilja of Greensburg, Pa., writes, "I'm looking for a Kahlua cake recipe. I had this cake at a party but did not get the recipe."

Julie Polansky of Easthampton, Mass., writes, "I am desperately seeking a recipe known to me as Ed's Mexican Lasagna. It used corn tortillas, cheeses, chili peppers and was absolutely delicious. Can you help?"

If you are looking for a recipe or can answer a request for a hard-to-find recipe, write to Ellen Hawks, Recipe Finder, The Sun, 501 N. Calvert St., Baltimore, MD 21278. If you send more than one recipe, please put each on a separate sheet of paper with your name, address and daytime phone number. Important: Please list the ingredients in order of use, and note the number of servings each recipe makes. Please type or print contributions.

Potato-Chip Cookies

Makes 24 to 30 cookies

1 cup (2 sticks) butter or margarine

1/2 cup white sugar, plus extra for dipping

2 teaspoons pure vanilla extract

1/2 cup crushed potato chips

1 1/2 cups all-purpose flour

1/2 cup roasted, ground pecans

Cream butter or margarine, sugar and vanilla extract. Add crushed chips, flour and nuts. Drop by spoonful onto an ungreased baking sheet. Press flat with a glass dipped in sugar. Bake at 350 degrees for 12 minutes, until golden around edges.

Tester Laura Reiley's comments: "Because of the amount of butter (and the lack of leavening), these cookies spread somewhat, so don't put them too close together on the baking sheet. A delicate sugar cookie; there is added textural interest from the chips and nuts. While they smell a little like potato chips, the taste is hard to discern. They stay crisp for a couple days in an airtight container, but soften quickly after that."

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