Southern-AA strikes fast, reaches final

Bulldogs' pace too much for Walkersville, 15-7

Class 2A-1A boys lacrosse

May 19, 2002|By Edward Lee | Edward Lee,SUN STAFF

The Southern boys lacrosse team introduced Walkersville to a different style of lacrosse.

Unleashing a swift-hitting attack that produced the game's first five goals, the Bulldogs of Anne Arundel County made quick work of Walkersville by sailing to a 15-7 victory in a Class 2A-1A state semifinal at CCBC-Catonsville yesterday.

The West Region champion Lions (13-5) were the first Frederick County team to reach the state semifinals.

"We felt that by putting pressure on them and riding them hard, maybe they didn't see that type of lacrosse in the western part of Maryland," said Southern coach Ray Bowen, whose squad won the East Region. "We hoped that by putting pressure on them, we could force some turnovers and start the transition."

The Bulldogs, who will be making their second straight state final appearance, won the first five faceoffs and owned a 5-0 lead just 6:06 into the game.

By halftime, senior attack Paul Sparacino had five goals and an assist, and Southern (14-4) enjoyed a 12-3 advantage.

"We had fresh legs, and that's what got us off to a good start," said Sparacino, who finished with six goals and three assists. "We just came ready to play."

Seniors Pat Hantske (three goals, one assist) and Dan Witt (one goal, three assists) also contributed.

The Bulldogs' defense and goalkeeper Cody Dunlap (two saves) contained Walkersville's top two scorers - attack Kyle Patton (59 goals) and midfielder David Schanuel (47 goals) - to three goals.

Southern will meet Centennial - 7-6 upset winners over defending Class 2A-1A state champion Pikesville in the other semifinal - in Tuesday's 6 p.m. final at UMBC.

"We didn't expect it to be this easy," Hantske said. "It gives us confidence, but we wanted a harder game to prepare us for the harder teams like Pikesville and Centennial."

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