Pasadena youth convicted in murder of gang leader

Teen-ager among five charged in the stabbing

May 18, 2002|BY A SUN STAFF WRITER

A jury convicted a Pasadena youth yesterday of first-degree murder in the stabbing death of a Glen Burnie man who authorities said had been a gang leader.

Andrew Grant Handschuh, 17, was tried as an adult for his role in the stabbing death in August of Mark Anthony Miller. The jury, which deliberated for six hours, also convicted him on charges of conspiracy to commit murder and being an accessory after the fact, according to the Anne Arundel County state's attorney's office.

Handschuh is one of five defendants charged in the killing. Police and prosecutors said Miller portrayed himself as a high-ranking member of a Glen Burnie gang that called itself the Crips, despite having no known affiliation with the Los Angeles-based gang of the same name.

Miller's control over the group annoyed Handschuh and two associates, James Thomas Blake, 19, of Severna Park, and Sean Matthew Almond, 20, of Glen Burnie, authorities have said. Prosecutors said the three men plotted to kill Miller at a party one night at the Glen Ridge apartments.

As Miller was attempting to brand a 16-year-old gang member, three men stabbed him. Miller was later found in a baseball field across the street with his throat slit, his head bashed in and his body covered with stab wounds.

Blake pleaded guilty to first-degree murder before Handschuh's trial began; Almond, charged with first-degree murder, is scheduled to go on trial in July. A fourth defendant, Tracy C. Devilbiss, 28, of Glen Burnie, pleaded guilty to second-degree murder and is cooperating with prosecutors. A fifth, the 16-year-old girl who was being branded, was placed in juvenile custody after admitting to being an accessory after the fact.

Handshuh could be sentenced to life in prison without the possibility of parole. He will be sentenced in September after the Almond trial.

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