Linda Boreman, 53, who starred as Linda Lovelace in the...

Deaths Elsewhere

April 23, 2002

Linda Boreman, 53, who starred as Linda Lovelace in the 1972 pornographic film Deep Throat but later became an anti-porn advocate, died yesterday in Denver from injuries she suffered in a car crash.

Ms. Boreman was taken to Denver Health Medical Center with massive trauma and internal injuries after the accident April 3, and was taken off life support yesterday, hospital spokeswoman Sara Spaulding said.

Ms. Boreman's ex-husband, Larry Marchiano, said he and their two adult children were at the hospital when she died.

"Everyone might know her as something else, but we knew her as mom and as Linda," Mr. Marchiano said. "We divorced five years ago, but she was still my best friend."

Ms. Boreman claimed her first husband forced her into pornography at gunpoint. They divorced in 1973.

Their relationship disintegrated into a life of violence, rape, prostitution and pornography, according to her 1980 autobiography, Ordeal, and her testimony before congressional committees investigating pornography.

Ms. Boreman said she was never paid a penny for Deep Throat, and her husband was paid only $1,250, though the film grossed a reported $600 million.

Maulvi Mohammed Nabi Mohammedi, 82, an Afghan militia leader who battled the Soviets and visited the White House in the 1980s, died yesterday in Pakistan, the Afghan Islamic Press reported.

Mr. Mohammedi's group, Harakat-e-Inqilab Islami Afghanistan, was one of seven Afghan guerrilla groups supported by the United States and other Western nations to wage an independence war against the invading Soviet Union during the 1980s.

Mr. Mohammedi was among Afghan leaders who met President Ronald Reagan at the White House during that war. President Reagan called the rebel leaders "freedom fighters."

Juno Lewis, 70, a musician, composer and instrument maker best known for "Kulu Se Mama," the composition that became a key element in one of jazz saxophonist John Coltrane's later recordings, died of stroke complications April 9 in Inglewood, Calif.

Born Julian Bertrand Lewis in New Orleans, Mr. Lewis showed an affinity for art at an early age, fashioning drums and learning to sculpt using mud from the nearby Mississippi River. By age 16, Mr. Lewis was working as a professional musician, primarily as a drummer.

After moving to Los Angeles in the 1950s, Mr. Lewis formed a Caribbean-style band, which performed in some of Hollywood's top clubs and hotels. He was also among the first black performers to find work in Las Vegas, playing at the Thunderbird Hotel.

But by the early 1960s, he had given up his band work and was focusing on his real passion - making drums and other musical instruments. Over the years, he produced an array of odd-looking and odd-sounding instruments: trumpets with double bells, and a horn that looked like a saxophone grafted onto a trumpet. Each would offer a sound much different in pitch from its standard counterpart.

John McDiarmid, 88, known for his studies and writings on ancient Greek philosophy, died of a heart attack April 15 in Seattle. He was chairman of the classics department at the University of Washington from 1949 to 1973.

Mr. McDiarmid earned undergraduate degrees in Latin and Greek at the University of Toronto and a doctorate in Greek at the Johns Hopkins University, where he taught for four years.

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