Dr. George Silverton, 93, radiologist, veteran

April 20, 2002

Dr. George Silverton, a retired Baltimore radiologist who served as a battalion surgeon during World War II, died Thursday of pneumonia at Roland Park Place. He was 93.

Dr. Silverton, who had lived in Cross Keys before moving to the retirement community two years ago, was born in Ansonia, Conn., where he graduated from high school.

He earned his bachelor's degree from Yale University in 1928 and was a 1932 graduate of the University of Maryland School of Medicine. He completed an internship in internal medicine at St. Raphael's Hospital in New Hampshire.

Dr. Silverton practiced general medicine in Baltimore until World War II, when he enlisted in the Army Medical Corps. Trained as a radiologist during the early war years, he served as a battalion surgeon with the famed 29th Division's 176th Regiment in the European Theater.

He landed in Europe five days after D-Day and participated in the Battle of St. Lo and the Battle of the Bulge in December 1945. Dr. Silverton served at the first military hospital that was established in Germany after Allied troops crossed the Rhine River at the Remagen Bridge.

After being discharged in 1945 with the rank of captain and earning five battle stars, he continued the study of radiology at Bellevue Hospital and Fifth Avenue Hospital in New York City.

From 1949 to 1969, when he retired, he was chief of radiology at Southeastern General Hospital in Lumberton, N.C. Returning to Baltimore in 1969, he was invited to join the radiology staff at the Veterans Hospital on Loch Raven Boulevard, where he worked until retiring a second time in 1993.

Dr. Silverton was a member of the Baltimore Hebrew Congregation.

Services were held yesterday.

He is survived by his wife, the former Sara Silberstein, whom he married in 1933; two daughters, Deborah Rosenfelt of University Park and Margery Silverton of Annapolis; and a granddaughter.

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