Towson women end Delaware hex with 12-11 win

Johns Hopkins women, Mount St. Mary's men fall

State

College Lacrosse

March 21, 2002|By FROM STAFF REPORTS

Kat Brady scored three goals and Kristyn Krastel, Caitlin Marshall and Amy Middleton each scored twice as Towson won its second straight, edging Delaware, 12-11, in a Colonial Athletic Association women's lacrosse game yesterday in Newark, Del.

With the win, the Tigers (3-3, 2-2) ended a seven-game losing streak to the Blue Hens (2-2, 1-2), defeating them for the first time since an 8-3 win in 1997.

Delaware struck first, 49 seconds into the game, but Towson answered with a five-goal run to take a 5-1 lead with 16:53 remaining in the first half en-route to a 7-4 lead.

Ashley Moderacki opened the second half with a goal, but Towson scored five of the next eight goals to take 12-8 lead with 6:56 left.

Moderacki scored a game-high six goals, including five in the second half.

Penn State 13, Johns Hopkins 9: Heidi Pearce scored three times as the Blue Jays (4-4, 2-2) fell to the Nittany Lions (3-2, 1-1) in an American Lacrosse Conference matchup.

Brooke Bailey and Katie Jeschke each scored four goals to lead Penn State in the program's Division I-record 500th women's lacrosse game.

Men

Bucknell 5, Mount St. Mary's 3: The Mountaineers (1-6) gave up two fourth-quarter goals as the Bison (2-4) won in a Patriot League game in Emmitsburg.

Mount St. Mary's held Bucknell scoreless for the second and third quarters.

Josh Warfield, Mark Cox and Billy Jautze scored for Mount St. Mary's.

Mount goalie Tom Dryer stopped 16 shots.

Western Maryland 12, Virginia Wesleyan 8: Attackman Joe Ellis had a game-high seven points on five goals and two assists to pace the visiting Green Terror (5-0) past the Marlins (4-2) in a non-league matchup.

Rob Weaver and Tom Brown each recorded two goals and one assist in the victory.

Virginia Wesleyan's four-game winning streak was halted.

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