Young talent helps on lively works with a Hungarian flair

Critic's Tip: Classical Music

February 24, 2002|By Tim Smith

There's nothing like Hungarian music to get the blood flowing. The Baltimore Chamber Orchestra, joined for part of the program by some of Maryland's top young musicians, will be reveling in gypsy airs and dances this week. Music by two of Hungary's finest composers, Zoltan Kodaly (the spirited Dances of Galanta) and Ernest von Dohnanyi (Serenade), will be featured.

And, of course, there will be selections from Johannes Brahms' Hungarian Dances. It is here that the BCO will have company onstage. High school students from Baltimore (city and county), Harford, Anne Arundel and Howard counties -- all members of the Maryland All-State Orchestra -- will play side-by-side with the professionals as part of a valuable educational project.

The concert, conducted by BCO founding music director Anne Harrigan, also includes two popular pieces for violin and orchestra -- Pablo Sarasate's Zigeunerweisen and Maurice Ravel's Tzigane -- inspired by the emotion and virtuosity of gypsy fiddling. The soloist will be Ivan Stefanovic, the BCO's Yugoslav-born principal second violinist and the Baltimore Symphony Orchestra's acting assistant principal violinist.

The concert is at 8 p.m. Wednesday at Goucher College's Kraushaar Auditorium. Tickets are $8 (for those under 18) to $24. Call 410-308-0402.

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