Tregoning running for re-election

Sheriff wants to centralize warrant processing unit

January 23, 2002|By Sheridan Lyons | Sheridan Lyons,SUN STAFF

Carroll County Sheriff Kenneth L. Tregoning announced yesterday that he will seek a second term, saying he enjoys the job and wants to continue his plans that emphasize coordination with other police agencies.

Changes during his four years include: expanding road patrol to a 24-hour operation; expanding the capacity of the county detention center; joining a reconstituted county drug-enforcement task force; improving mutual-aid agreements, including deputizing town police officers; and a central booking unit that he said saves each officer 2 1/2 hours per arrest -the equivalent of having 4 1/2 more officers on county roads.

That's important in a county with 1.4 officers - including state police and town officers - per 1,000 people, he said, compared with a state average of 2.8 and a national average of 2.5 for rural areas, and 2.6 in suburban areas. Central booking means an arrested suspect can be identified, charged and jailed in one location.

"In my second term, I would also like to see the creation of a central warrant unit ... to reduce the likelihood of someone slipping through the system who many be wanted," Tregoning said. About 1,500 warrants are handled by county agencies each year.

Tregoning said the county's agreement to house federal prisoners for the Immigration and Naturalization Service will have brought Carroll about $2 million by the end of next month. The arrangement began in February 2000.

The jail housed 663 INS prisoners in the last fiscal year.

Tregoning, 57, a county resident since 1973, was elected sheriff in 1998.

He retired in December 1998 after a 31-year career with Maryland State Police, most recently as a lieutenant and commander of the barracks in Frederick, and including a stint as head of the Westminster barracks from 1989 to 1992.

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