Star-Spangled Banner Flag House

MARYLAND SCENE

November 04, 2001|By Sloane Brown

The family feel to the second annual "Baltimore Bash" went beyond the expected at the Star-Spangled Banner Flag House fund-raiser. The party had been postponed from Sept. 15 because of the events of Sept. 11. So its themes of family and country seemed intensified. But so was the fun.

Inside the Baltimore Brewing Co. building next door to the Flag House, kids created artistic masterpieces at a crafts table. They also pasted red and blue stickers on a large white posterboard to create a replica of the flag, while their parents scanned the silent auction table nearby. Several other young partygoers hovered over another flag display made up of cupcakes -- each covered in a Berger-cookie size blob of red, white or blue icing -- in deep decision-making mode over which cupcake to nab. Meanwhile, a band played dance tunes in a tent outside.

Among those enjoying the activities: Sarah Rhea, event co-chair; Corrie Fleischer, George and Susan Linthicum, Beth Mulcahey and Kristen Shaab, event committee; Tim Naylor, Flag House board president; Skip Deeley, Georgia Linthicum, Russell Rich, Tom Young and Lois Zanow, board members; Sally Johnston, Flag House executive director; Sana Brooks, Baltimore Education Scholarship Trust consultant; Jim Gardner, Council on Quality and Leadership president / CEO; Lou Hargrave, Bank of America vice president; Thomas J.S. Waxter Jr., Baltimore Circuit Court judge; Nancy Hayden, Century Merchant Bankers associate; Tom Key Lynn, Boys Latin School teacher; Scott Bayne, Parkville Middle School teacher; Ameriga Strache, Constellation Energy translator; Peter Barretta, Federal Aviation Administration air traffic automation manager; Tom McCracken, Henry H. Lewis Contractors vice president; Libby Naylor, Naylor Antiques vice president; and the Rev. Jarrett Wicklein, Mount Vernon Place United Methodist Church pastor.

The bash brought in about $20,000 for the Star-Spangled Banner Flag House, the home of Mary Pickersgill, who sewed the banner that flew over Fort McHenry and inspired Francis Scott Key to write our national anthem.

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