Cohen offers thanks to Eastport supporters I would...

Letters

October 21, 2001

Cohen offers thanks to Eastport supporters

I would like to thank the Democratic voters of Ward 8 for their support in last month's primary election. The strong showing of support was both gratifying and humbling. A campaign is truly a group effort, and special thanks go to the many volunteers who so generously gave of their time and energy to help.

I congratulate [primary election opponent] Doug Lamborne on running a strong and positive campaign. Doug's leadership and involvement have been crucial to making Eastport the wonderful community it is today.

Despite its qualities, Eastport faces many serious challenges: mounting a long-term, effective strategy to reduce crime; preserving our unique neighborhood scale and character; empowering struggling individuals through job skills training, substance abuse treatment and other needed programs; implementing a comprehensive transportation and parking plan.

In Eastport, we solve problems by working together in a spirit of mutual collaboration. Despite our differences, we share similar concerns, similar responsibilities to each other and similar optimism for the future. I have been fortunate to work with many of you to improve our quality of life, and I ask for your continuing support on Nov. 6.

Josh Cohen

Annapolis(Josh Cohen is the Democratic candidate for alderman in Ward 8.)

Hate crime is hate, regardless of skin color

I think the article [on a police announcement that vandalism of a minister's home was not a hate crime] (Oct. 16, 2001) missed the point. The August vandalism in Gambrills was, without a doubt, a hate crime. ... If someone that had a personnel vendetta against the leader of a church, defaced the church with anti-religious graffiti, would they not be guilty of a hate crime, even if the person were a member of that church?

The fact that the people accused of the vandalism knew the victim and were of the same race should not be a factor in charging them with a hate crime. Hate crime is defined by the crime, not the color of the perpetrator's skin.

Mike Johnson

Odenton

Shortsighted U.S. policy to blame for Sept. 11

Kirvan Pierson's claim that Sept. 11 occurred in part because of former President Clinton's "broken promises" is incomplete ("Clinton's broken promises paved way for Sept. 11 terror," Oct. 13).

This current crisis is not the fault of one president. It is a steady and protracted failure of American foreign policy to understand the conflicts in the region. Pierson's analysis clearly ignores past Middle East actions or inaction by presidents other than Clinton and the U.S. policy of silent support for questionable Israeli actions. In typical American short-sightedness, the analysis failed to dig deeper.

Steven Frost

Pasadena

Protesters must learn that freedom is not free

Since Sept. 11, many government agencies have sought and secured some increased authority from Congress and the courts to materially improve their ability to monitor, track and apprehend suspected terrorists.

As usual, there are those that have inherited their freedom endeavoring to prevent any such increased authority yelling loud and clear that it violates their civil rights and/or takes away freedom. Even worse, [there are] those that promote the thesis we should do nothing but sit back, do nothing, and let more Americans die. For too many years history has taught us that neither of these will end the terror. Sooner or later we had to fight back.

What is it, America? Do we have the will to win this war, or is it too important to argue among ourselves? I respectfully submit one should consider the freedom millions of draftees gave up and the too many that paid the ultimate price for the freedom we enjoy today. Freedom is not free.

Unfortunately, I can not distinguish the difference between Pearl Harbor and the World Trade Towers, but apparently they can. I would appreciate their logic.

L.O. Warfield

Annapolis

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