Student group at AACC casts its vote for its top teachers at the institution

May 13, 2001

Who are the best teachers? Students at Anne Arundel Community College have had their say.

Recognized this year by the AACC Student Association were three faculty members who received teaching excellence awards and an adviser for work with the student newspaper.

The winners are:

Louis L. Aymard Jr. of Stevensville, professor of psychology, who received the Teaching Excellence Award for full-time faculty. Among the nomination comments: "A gifted teacher who cares about all of his students."

Aymard has created interactive television courses and games, Internet exercises, audiotapes, slide shows, computer databases and software for student use in psychology and American Sign Language. He is a graduate of Mount St. Mary's College and earned his doctorate in psychology at Catholic University of America. Aymard joined the college in 1972.

Frank B. Pesci Sr. of New Carrollton, who received the Teaching Excellence Award for part-time instructors. A former legislator for 16 years in the House of Delegates, he coordinates the AACC's Legislative Internship program and teaches political science.

Pesci has been an associate professor in the School of Education for Catholic University of America; professor of government, dean of academic affairs and vice chairman of the board of trustees at Prince George's Community College; and adjunct professor at the Johns Hopkins University.

Pesci earned praise for his passion for teaching and commitment to students. He is a graduate of Seton Hall University and earned his master's degree and doctorate in policy/political science at Catholic University in Washington.

Carey C. Borkoski of Severna Park, an assistant professor of economics who joined the faculty last year and received the Rookie Professor of the Year Award. Students praised her enthusiasm, thorough organization, innovative teaching techniques that made the class fun and her concern for each student.

Borkoski is a graduate of Wake Forest University and earned her master of arts degree at the University of North Carolina, Greensboro.

Donald H. Richardson Jr. of Pasadena, faculty adviser for the Campus Crier, the student newspaper, who received the Adviser of the Year Award.

A part-time instructor of English at AACC, Richardson also teaches grade school and adult poetry classes, and conducts poetry workshops for the Maryland State Arts Council. He earned his bachelor of arts degree in American Studies at George Washington University.

Students submit nominations anonymously, using a form printed in the student newspaper. They are reviewed by a student committee whose evaluation includes classroom visits to see the teachers in action. Criteria include an effective teaching style, challenging students to increase their skills and reinforcing the creative process.

Lenny Mancini, the college's dean of student services, said the honorees receive a plaque and a small cash award, which many choose to donate to their favorite cause.

The annual student honor, he added, "is held in pretty high esteem by the faculty."

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