Bush's 4th Circuit nominees would broaden panel's view

Appeals court called most conservative

May 10, 2001|By Thomas Healy | Thomas Healy,SUN NATIONAL STAFF

WASHINGTON - President Bush's three nominees to the U.S. Court of Appeals for the 4th Circuit, which covers Maryland, would bring a mix of political views and professional backgrounds to what is regarded as the nation's most conservative appeals court.

Here is a look at the nominees:

Terrence W. Boyle, 55, is chief judge for the U.S. District Court for the Eastern District of North Carolina. A graduate of American University's Washington College of Law, he served as a legislative aide to North Carolina Sen. Jesse Helms and worked in private practice before being appointed to the court by President Ronald Reagan in 1984.

He was later nominated to the 4th Circuit by President George H.W. Bush. But the Senate, then controlled by Democrats, did not act on the nomination, and it lapsed when Bush left office.

As a district court judge, Boyle has been solidly conservative. He twice ruled that North Carolina had impermissibly taken race into account in drawing congressional districts but was reversed both times by the Supreme Court. He also ruled that states could not be sued by disabled workers under the Americans With Disabilities Act. The high court concurred.

Dennis W. Shedd, 48, is a district judge in South Carolina. He received his law degree from the University of South Carolina and served as a top aide to South Carolina Sen. Strom Thurmond. He also taught law before the senior Bush appointed him to the district court in 1991. Shedd ruled that Congress exceeded its power when it passed the Drivers' Privacy Protection Act, which limited states' ability to release personal information about drivers. The Supreme Court reversed that decision.

Roger Gregory, 47, was appointed to a one-year term on the 4th Circuit shortly before President Bill Clinton left office. He is the first black judge to sit on that circuit. Gregory received his law degree from the University of Michigan and practiced corporate law in Richmond, Va., before his appointment to the court.

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