Great Blacks in Wax Museum

MARYLAND SCENE

April 22, 2001|By Sloane Brown

The Engineers Club was packed with people, including three replicas thereof. The 500 real folks circulated through sitting rooms of the historic building catching up with old friends and snagging a bite from the buffet. In the ballroom, the three nonhuman guests of honor awaited their introductions in an unveiling ceremony presenting the newest additions to the Great Blacks in Wax Museum's collection. Two of the figures would also be greeting their flesh-and-blood counterparts -- Baltimore entrepreneur-philanthropists Osborne Payne and Harlow Fullwood Jr. Both were at the party, but they were not allowed to see their wax facsimiles until the official unveiling.

"My family has seen [the replica of me]," Payne said with a smile, "and if they can put up with it, I can too."

The third new waxwork revealed, at the event co-sponsored by the President's Roundtable, was that of Isaac Myers (1835-1891), one of Baltimore's first black business leaders.

Among those present: Bernard Jennings, Craig Thompson and Patricia Tunstall, museum board members; Kenneth R. Banks, Eddie Brown, Joe Haskins, Victor C. March Sr. and Arnold Williams, President's Roundtable members; Jeff Miller, Miller's Metropolitan Chapel president; Rahn Barnes, Urban Financial Services Coalition president; Cheryl Yuille, Allfirst Bank credit analyst; Bill Lorenz, Bank of America Greater Baltimore president; Will Francis, WMAR-TV senior sales / marketing executive; Dr. Charles Tildon, Baltimore School Commission board chair; Camay Murphy, Baltimore school board commissioner; Ackneil M. Muldrow II, Development Credit Fund president / CEO; Barry Powell, Baltimore deputy police commissioner; Allen Schiff, Grabush Newman CPAs accountant; and Frances Reaves, Maryland Department of Economic and Business Development manager / team leader.

The get-together raised $30,000 for the Great Blacks in Wax Museum.

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