Baltimore School for the Arts

MARYLAND SCENE

March 18, 2001|By Sloane Brown

Some learned how to move their hips and feet to a percussive Latin beat in the dance studio. Some performed scenes from "Body Heat," "Casablanca" and "On the Waterfront" in the rehearsal hall. Some played an Elvis Presley hit on various instruments in the music room. Others created collage jewelry in the art room. And that was just for starters at Expressions 2001.

Then, these 460 guests gathered in the Baltimore School for the Arts ballroom to compare notes, eat dinner and watch students from the school display their theatrical, dance and musical talents for an appreciative audience.

The evening ended with rave reviews from the likes of Erin Becker and Lisa Hardiman, event co-chairs; Mary Dempsey, Samuel Polakoff, Amy Elias and Sally Michel, past event chairs; Clair Zamoiski Segal, Baltimore School for the Arts board chair; Jim Dales, Sharon F. Nevins and Stewart Rosenberg, board members; Leslie Shepard, the school's acting director; Carole Sibel, Friends Assisting New Stars (FANS) board chair; Bob Embry, Abell Foundation president; Buddy Zamoiski, Independent Distributors Inc. chairman; Stan Weiman, Everyman Theatre company member; LaWanda Edwards, Comcast Cable government and public affairs manager; Amy Lowenstein, LifeBridge Health and Fitness spinning exercise coordinator; Jean Fugett, retired National Security Agency education and training officer; Ellie Carey, Governor's Workforce Investment Board chair; K.C. Burton, Annie E. Casey Foundation senior associate; Henry Rosenberg, Crown Petroleum CEO; Carmen Russo, Baltimore schools CEO; Patrick Kerins, Grotech Capital Group general partner; Ruth Shaw, Ruth Shaw owner; Helmut Jenkner, Space Telescope Science Institute scientist; Joe Rubino, Baltimore photographer; Steve Yeager, Baltimore filmmaker; and Rhea Arnot, Arnot & Associates owner.

The shindig raised more than $120,000 for the school.

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