Seven graduates of police academy to join law enforcement in Carroll

First class graduates from academy at college

March 04, 2001

Carroll Community College and the Maryland Police and Correctional Training Commission are providing the Maryland Law Enforcement Training Academy a home at the Westminster college.

Twenty-four cadets composed the first class. They started training Oct. 16 and graduated Feb. 23.

Agencies in Carroll County will employ seven of the graduates. Two - Jesse Gregory Clagett and Gregory Domingo Fabela - will be with the Westminster Police Department. The Carroll County Sheriff's Office will employ five: Diane Francine Conaway, William John Mansfield, Robert Eric Riggio, Rex Washington Scott Sr. and Bruce Todd Vanleuvan.

The other graduates and their assignments are:

Daniel Eugene Gosnell: Aberdeen Police Department.

Jacqueline Conway-Sheppard and Myron S. Jackson: Baltimore City Sheriff's Office.

Shawn L. Yates: central home detention.

Darren John Price and Jeremy David Robison: Cumberland Police Department.

Jason Thomas Hoffman, David Vogel, Joseph Carl Wilson and Michael Steven Zack: Elkton Police Department.

Daniel P. Duggan and Brent Nelson Sanders: Garrett County Sheriff's Office.

Melvin A. Hunter and Cynthia Janet McNeely: pretrial detention and services.

David Edmund Ryan: Rockville Police Department.

Travis E. Henry and Daniel Robert Lewis: University Park Police Department.

The 19-week program entailed 760 hours of academy training.

The college will let the graduates convert their academy training hours into nine credits, which can be applied to an associate's degree in the criminal justice program.

Cadets must take hiring tests and be accepted by a law enforcement agency before being admitted to the academy, which has a full-time on-site manager, four full-time instructors and one full-time administrative assistant.

Academy information: William Crabill, academy manager, 410- 386-8133.

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