Today in history: Jan. 2 In 1492, the leader of the...

Almanac

January 02, 2001

Today in history: Jan. 2

In 1492, the leader of the last Arab stronghold in Spain surrendered to Spanish forces loyal to King Ferdinand II and Queen Isabella I.

In 1788, Georgia became the fourth state to ratify the U.S. Constitution.

In 1900, Secretary of State John Hay announced the Open Door Policy to facilitate trade with China.

In 1921, religious services were broadcast on radio for the first time as KDKA in Pittsburgh aired the regular Sunday service of the city's Calvary Episcopal Church.

In 1929, the United States and Canada reached agreement on joint action to preserve Niagara Falls.

In 1935, Bruno Hauptmann went on trial in Flemington, N.J., on charges of kidnapping and murdering the infant son of Charles and Anne Lindbergh. (Hauptmann was found guilty, and executed.)

In 1942, the Philippine capital of Manila was captured by Japanese forces during World War II.

In 1960, Sen. John F. Kennedy of Massachusetts announced his candidacy for the Democratic presidential nomination.

In 1965, the New York Jets signed University of Alabama quarterback Joe Namath for a reported $400,000.

In 1974, President Nixon signed legislation requiring states to limit highway speeds to 55 mph. (Federal speed limits were abolished in 1995.)

In 1983, the musical play "Annie," based on the "Little Orphan Annie" comic strip, closed after a run of 2,377 Broadway performances.

Ten years ago: European, Soviet and Arab officials pushed for talks to avert war with Iraq. Sharon Pratt Dixon was sworn in as mayor of the District of Columbia, becoming the first black woman to head a city of Washington's size and prominence.

One year ago: Retired Adm. Elmo R. Zumwalt Jr., known early in his career for modernizing the Navy and later for ordering the spraying of Agent Orange in Vietnam, died in Durham, N.C., at age 79.

Associated Press

Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.