Yehuda Amichai, 76, who invented an Israeli poetic...

Deaths Elsewhere

September 23, 2000

Yehuda Amichai, 76, who invented an Israeli poetic language that blended the longings of the ancient Jewish poets and the spare introspection of modern stylists, died yesterday in Jerusalem of cancer.

He wrote in Hebrew and was probably Israel's most translated poet - an Arabic edition was once published in Egypt, and his work has appeared in Chinese.

Perpetually nominated for the Nobel literature prize, Mr. Amichai became famous for gently coaxing the world to see the people living among his country's ancient stories.

The Rev. Edward O. Miller 84, an Episcopal minister who backed liberal causes, died Sept. 16 in Castine, Maine, after a long illness.

The outspoken liberal was best known for testifying before the House Judiciary Committee in 1964 against a constitutional amendment to allow prayer in public school. He spoke on behalf of the American Civil Liberties Union. He was a member of the ACLU's board.

Jean-Louis Sieff, 66, a French photographer best known for highly sensual fashion shots in black and white, died Wednesday in Paris.

Edward S. Gordon, 65, a commercial real estate broker who built one of the largest real estate service companies in the New York City area, died Thursday in Water Mill, N.Y., of colon cancer. He founded the Edward S. Gordon Co. in 1972.

Lester Novros, 91, a pioneer of large format film technology and University of Southern California film professor whose students included "Star Wars" director George Lucas, died Sept. 10 in Los Angeles.

The 6th Duke of Sutherland, 85, owner of one of the great private collections of Old Master paintings, died Thursday in a hospital near Mertoun, his estate in southeast Scotland. He had suffered a brief illness, his wife said.

Gherman S. Titov, 65, the second man to orbit the Earth and a towering hero of the Soviet-American space race, was found dead from carbon monoxide poisoning Wednesday in his Moscow apartment, said police, who were treating his death as an accident.

The highly decorated cosmonaut's orbit of the Earth came after his compatriot Yuri Gagarin's historic flight in the Vostok-1 space capsule in April 1961.

He received the Soviet Union's highest awards, including the order of Hero of the Soviet Union.

Nathan Kroll, 88, a producer of award-winning television documentaries about cellist Pablo Casals, violinist Jascha Heifetz and tenor Luciano Pavarotti, died Sept. 14 in New York.

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