Styles mingle in mansion The 1851 Rochelle Mansion...

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September 17, 2000|By Karol V. Menzie | By Karol V. Menzie,SUN STAFF

Styles mingle in mansion

The 1851 Rochelle Mansion, considered Harford County's best example of Greek Revival domestic architecture, has become a decorator show piece in an event to benefit cancer-fighting programs of the AMC Harford County Chapter. The two-story house is crowned by a widow's walk and sheltered by a porch with tall columns.

There are 23 decorated spaces, plus landscaping, by more than two dozen designers across Maryland. Highlights include a hand-painted pastoral landscape mural on all walls of the living room by Kristina Wasmer, Baldwin Mill Studio, a study/computer room on the second floor by Hitchcock and Hentz, designers in Bel Air, and a period children's suite in the attic by Simple Grand Furniture of Jarrettsville.

Hours are from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Monday through Saturday; closing hour is extended to 7 p.m. on Thursday. On Sunday, hours are 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. The house will be open through Sept. 24. Tickets are $12. The event features a cafM-i, decorator sales and boutiques. (Admission to the cafM-i and the boutiques is free.) For tickets or more information, call 410-877-8792.

Eye-popping color

When you open a paint brochure and say "Wow!" at the colors, it must be a good thing. Minwax, a reliable purveyor of stains and finishes for all sorts of wood items, has introduced a new line of water-based stains in such glorious colors as fruit punch, Baltic green and sangria. There are 60 colors, custom-mixed at the store. While some are subtle (natural beige, winter sky), it's the dramatic ones that stimulate a host of new ideas. Need more storage space? An unfinished chest could be transformed by painting the base in green tea and drawer fronts in mandarin orange. A quart of custom-mixed stain costs between $7 and $8.

Available at paint and home improvement centers nationwide. For more information, check www.minwax.com. (Note: Results on wood may differ somewhat from the colors in the photo.) -K.M.

Clean-lined cabinetry

A few years ago, a trend in kitchen design made its way across the Atlantic from England, where "unfitted," or furniture-style, cabinetry is traditional, and had become newly popular. While the styles were beautiful, they were usually ornate and Old-Worldly and, being custom-fitted, were definitely expensive.

Now Snaidero Kitchen Design of Los Angeles has produced unfitted kitchen furniture that is clean-lined, striking and relatively less expensive than the carved-wood extravaganzas already available. It's called Tema, and includes a wide range of kitchen storage pieces (cabinets have internal lighting and glass shelves) and accessories. (The island pictured costs $5,500, without countertop.) Available through kitchen designers and other building professionals. For more information, visit the Web site at www.snaidero-usa.com. -K.M.

Events:

Programs of Historic Ellicott City, Inc. will benefit from a designer show house at Cattail Farm, 4078 Washington Road, Route 97 south, Glenwood. Besides tours of the house, there will be boutiques, a garden shop, and cafM-i and tea room. Hours are 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Tuesday through Saturday, extended to 8 p.m. on Tuesday and Thursday, and from noon to 5 p.m. on Sunday. The house is closed on Monday. Admission is $10 in advance, $12 at the door. For more information, call 410-461-6908.

Gardeners with a lot of shade know that ferns are a good candidate for those dimmer spots. A slide presentation and lecture called Ferns for Maryland Gardens, by Diane Lewis, of the Brookside Gardens staff, will cover which ferns grow best in the state and what fern-like cousins will also do well. The lecture is from 1 p.m. to 2:30 p.m. on Thursday in the Visitor's Center Adult Classroom. There is a fee of $11, and registration is required. Brookside Gardens is at1800 Glenallen Ave., in Wheaton. To register, or for more information, call 301-962-1451.

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