Area garden clubs flourish at national competition

NEIGHBORS

July 27, 2000|By Joni Guhne | Joni Guhne,SPECIAL TO THE SUN

TWENTY-TWO Marylanders, including several from Anne Arundel, attended the National Council of State Garden Clubs' 71st annual convention in San Diego, joining more than 1,000 participants from the United States and South America.

Among the locals were the president of Maryland Federated Garden Clubs Pat Pickett of Bel Air, and several members from District II, which stretches from Greater Severna Park to the Broadneck Peninsula and Annapolis.

The District II group included Judy Clemson and Marie Coulter, past Maryland state garden club presidents; and Lissa Williamson, director of District II, and Millie Sample, vice director of District II.

Also attending were Dorothy Huston and Dorothy Wadsworth, past directors of District II; Sylvia Smith, president of Moonflower Garden Club in Severna Park and historian of District II; and Elizabeth Wyble, president of the Severn River Garden Club.

Competition among clubs and club members at the weeklong event was a convention highlight.

Several Maryland clubs were among the winners. Moonflower Garden Club's yearbook made it to the final competition.

"Moonflower's yearbook was runner-up for a national award," Smith says with pride. "This was the first yearbook we ever did, and we beat everyone in the state in our club size."

"My favorite competition," Smith says, "was the international flower show. It was spectacular. People brought flowers from all over South America and the United States."

The Tricolor Award, the highest given in the international category, went to Baltimore County resident Mae Scott, vice president of Maryland Federated Garden Clubs.

Parade winners

With so many exciting entries in this year's annual Greater Severna Park Fourth of July Parade, judges Bruce Karner, Suzan Lynn, Diana Richards and Nancy Sabold of the Park's chamber of commerce had their hands full when it came to naming the best.

They finally selected these winners: first place for best community floats, Old Severna Park Improvement Association; second place, West Severna Park; and third place, Linstead.

Best community walking entry: Brittingham. (No other prizes in this category.)

First-place club float honors went to the Severn River Swim Club, and second place to the veterans' float: Pete Miller's 1944 Dodge weapons carrier. Riding on the float were veterans Boris Spiroff, Joe Corcoran, Robert Dexter, Pat Jose, Thomas Creekmore, Frank Lafferty, George Asaki, Hubert Roy, Wallace Hankins and William Krieger.

The Severna Park Elks took third prize for its float.

In the walking club division, first place went to parade color guard James Waddell Camp 1608 and Maryland Line Camp 1741, both Civil War re-enactors. The second-place winner was the color guard from the Navy Sea Cadet Corps.

Third place went to the Chesapeake Plantation walking horses.

In the category of commercial floats, the winners were: first place, O'Conor Piper & Flynn; second place, Garry's Grill/Woodfire; and third place, Big Vanilla.

Winners in the commercial walking category were: first place, Old Navy; second place, Holiday the Clown; and third place, Zippy the Mailbox.

Awards in the Vintage auto category were: first place, John Listman; second place, Pets on Wheels; and third place, a 1960 Seagrave pumper.

With no age restrictions, the decorated bike contest attracts tots on tricycles through kids in elementary school. This part of the parade was organized and judged by Pedal Pushers Bike Shop and Children's Discovery Center.

Named most beautiful were: first place, Jonathan Bark; second place, Caitlin Leach; and third place, Morgan Nehring.

Most patriotic were: first place, Nicholas Gallager; second place, Brianna Smith; and third place, Perry Harkum.

Most original were: first place, Mikey Powers; second place, Garrett Gooding; and in a tie for third place, Patrick Lienau and Paige and Brooke Winsness.

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