Youth baseball chief scores success

Profile

Howard At Play

May 21, 2000|By Lowell E. Sunderland

Name: William "Pat" Farrell

Job description: Baseball commissioner of Howard County Youth Program, with tenure ending in August. Vice commissioner last year. Eighth year in Ellicott City-oriented organization. Program includes instructional fall group and the more formal, larger spring leagues, which have more than 100 teams, about 1,500 players, about 300 managers and coaches. Group's annual $500,000 budget includes equipment, uniforms, training managers and umpires, as well as field maintenance and concessions at Kiwanis-Wallas Park's eight baseball fields.

Age: 41

Residence: Mount Hebron section, Ellicott City

Personal: Catonsville native, Cardinal Gibbons High School and University of Maryland, Baltimore County graduate. The former economics major has been a computer specialist at Social Security Administration, where he has worked since a college work-study program there. He and wife Janhave two sons, Ryan, 14, and Scott, 12, both playing ball. Memento on his desk is a team photo from Catonsville rec ball when he was about 10 given by a former teammate who recently registered his son in HCYP.

Biggest satisfaction of HCYP work: "Walking out there at Wallas Park, looking across eight baseball fields and seeing kids enjoying themselves. As commissioner, it's been getting our fields back into good shape, because they had deteriorated. But we're getting compliments again. I've been really encouraged by how people have volunteered, because the number of volunteers was falling off. I mean, we had 45 people help lay sod when our full-size diamond was renovated. Then, some came back to help with a smaller field."

Job's biggest challenge: "Keeping my enthusiasm up after two years of this. It's so much work that I've got to push myself a little bit. But it's not only me doing it, of course. A lot of people spend a lot of time at Wallas Park. I rely particularly on the 25 or so on our board who get most of the things we need done. Because of how HCYP works, which makes sure people get administrative experience as they go along, you're pretty much guaranteed success."

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