Program seeks airport access from rural areas The...

BWI DIGEST

May 15, 2000

Program seeks airport access from rural areas

The Maryland Aviation Administration is developing a program to provide Maryland residents and businesses in rural areas with convenient air access to Baltimore-Washington International Airport (BWI).

In an effort to further economic development in distant communities, the state has provided up to $5 million over the next three years to plan regional air service. The aviation administration will meet with communities and conduct surveys to determine which areas would be best served by regional air service and what type of service is needed.

"As we move aggressively to create good jobs and strengthen the economy in rural regions of the state, direct air service from these regions to BWI becomes increasingly important," said Gov. Parris N. Glendening. "With the strong support of Speaker [Casper R.] Taylor, we can now begin to work with communities and air service providers to determine where service would have the greatest impact and how we can provide it in a financially sound manner. If successful, the new direct flights would benefit BWI and every corner of the state."

The aviation administration concluded a preliminary study this year that identified nine companies interested in providing regional service to BWI. The aviation administration will assist Maryland communities in applying for federal funding under the Service Improvement to Small Communities initiative.

Current estimates indicate one-way fares would need to be in the $50 range to make flying a competitive alternative to driving to and parking at BWI.

Blackshear to speak to BWI Partnership

David L. Blackshear, executive director of the Maryland Aviation Administration, will be the keynote speaker for the 15th meeting of the BWI Business Partnership at 7:45 a.m. Thursday at Northrop Grumman's Historic Electronics Museum.

Information: 410-859-1000 or www.bwipartner.org.

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