Westminster High educator named Teacher of the Year

Alan P. Zepp is nominee for statewide honor

May 12, 2000|BY A SUN STAFF WRITER

Carroll County school officials have recognized Westminster High School English teacher Alan P. Zepp as Carroll County's Teacher of the Year.

"His masterful use of humor, creativity and emphasis on the task at hand produces a successful learning environment for students who have not always met with success in the classroom," Mary K. Nevius-Maurer wrote of Zepp's work with special education and basic skills students. Nevius-Maurer, chairwoman of Westminster High's English department, has worked with Zepp for 11 years.

In addition to his work in the classroom, Zepp also gives up his lunch and planning periods to work with students on independent studies, serves as adviser to the school's literary magazine, Quintessence, tutors at-risk students and mentors new teachers.

"While we often read books or watch films about those we consider mythical teachers who do the impossible," Nevius-Maurer wrote in her nomination letter, "there is one who is miraculously in our midst: Alan Zepp."

Zepp, a teacher for 13 years, becomes Carroll's nominee for the statewide award. He was recognized with a plaque at a school board meeting Wednesday night.

In other business Wednesday, Superintendent William H. Hyde announced the shuffling of high school principals in preparation for the opening of two high schools.

David Booz, South Carroll High principal, will become principal of Century High, which is scheduled to open next year.

Sherri-Le Bream, Westminster High School principal, will become principal of a new high school scheduled to open in Westminster in 2002.

George Phillips, Francis Scott Key High principal, will become principal at South Carroll High.

Randy Clark, Liberty High principal, will become principal of Francis Scott Key.

Hyde did not announce replacement principals for Westminster High or Liberty High.

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