Neal Matthews Jr., 70, who sang backup to Elvis Presley...

Deaths Elsewhere

April 24, 2000

Neal Matthews Jr., 70, who sang backup to Elvis Presley, Patsy Cline and many others as part of the singing quartet the Jordanaires, died Friday of an apparent heart attack at his home in Brentwood, Tenn., outside Nashville.

The Nashville native joined the Jordanaires as second tenor in 1953, and the group began performing with Mr. Presley in 1956. Its gospel-influenced background harmony was an integral part of numerous recordings by Mr. Presley, including "Hound Dog" and "Don't Be Cruel."

The group also recorded with Ricky Nelson, Marie Osmond, Jimmy Dean, Merle Haggard and Tom Jones. On stage, it backed stars such as Marty Robbins, Kitty Wells, Jim Reeves, Tennessee Ernie Ford and Don Gibson.

Mr. Matthews returned to performing after suffering a stroke five years ago. He recently sang with the quartet in Las Vegas and was scheduled to return there next

George Moore, 95, a former leading U.S. banker and head of the Metropolitan Opera, died Friday at his home in southern Spain. After studying at Yale, he jointed Farmers Loan and Trust Co., which later merged with First National City Bank of New York, which became Citibank.

He rose to run the bank's domestic division and later its overseas operations in the late 1950s and early 1960s. He retired from the bank in 1967.

Philip C. Keenan, 92, whose work in the spectral classification of stars helped astronomers understand the chemical evolution of galaxies, died Thursday at a hospital in Columbus, Ohio.

He was emeritus professor of astronomy at Ohio State University in Columbus.

Alfred Peck O'Hara, 80, a Manhattan lawyer, former federal prosecutor and past president of Bacardi Corp., died April 15 at his home in Patterson, his birthplace in Putnam County, N.Y.

Ronald Lockley, 96, a naturalist and prolific author whose four-year study of rabbits inspired Richard Adams' 1972 book "Watership Down," died April 12 in Auckland, New Zealand.

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