Alyssa Caezza, 27, restaurant worker Alyssa Caezza, a...

April 03, 2000

Alyssa Caezza, 27, restaurant worker

Alyssa Caezza, a server at the Cheesecake Factory at Harborplace and an animal lover, died Friday after being struck by a Baltimore police squad car. The Bolton Hill resident was 27.

Ms. Caezza graduated in 1990 from Commack High School in her native Long Island. She was a volunteer for the Special Olympics and taught Sunday school at St. Paul Lutheran Church in East Northport, N.Y.

She graduated from then-Towson State University in 1995 with a degree in mass communications. A love of cooking drew her into the restaurant business.

After three years at the Cheesecake Factory, she was about to begin working as a food service manager at the Camden Club at Oriole Park at Camden Yards.

Among her favorite pastimes was running with her friends and their dogs at the Loch Raven Reservoir basin and its surrounding woods and hills.

"She always loved animals and the outdoors," said her mother, Mary Ann Stothard of West Palm Beach, Fla. "Our house in Long Island always had some kind of animal recuperating in it when she was growing up."

Her father, Joseph Caezza, died in 1990.

A funeral will be held at 3 p.m. today at Leonard J. Ruck funeral home, 5303 Harford Road.

In addition to her mother, she is survived by a sister, Jennifer Caezza of San Francisco; her stepfather, Robert Stothard of West Palm Beach; and two stepbrothers, Geoffrey Stothard of Arlington, Va., and Christopher Stothard of New York City.

Marjorie `Meems' Johnson, 89, schoolteacher

Marjorie Gertrude "Meems" Johnson, a retired elementary school teacher, died Tuesday of cancer at Greater Baltimore Medical Center. She was 89 and lived in Lutherville.

She taught first grade at Essex Elementary School for 25 years and retired in 1977. Before then, she was a teacher in Pennsylvania.

Born in Pittsburgh, Marjorie Davis was raised in Norwood, Pa. She earned a two-year teaching certificate at West Chester (Pa.) College and a bachelor's degree at then-Towson State College in 1963.

In 1934, she married George Edmond Johnson and, in 1945, the couple moved to Essex from Pennsylvania. They moved to Lutherville in 1961.

Mr. Johnson died in 1981.

Mrs. Johnson attended Towson United Methodist Church and until December was active in many organizations, including the Towson Methodist Women's Circle, the American Association of University Women and the Arts Club of Homeland.

She was a lifetime member of the Eastern Star.

Services will be held at 11 a.m. today at Towson United Methodist Church, 501 Hampton Lane.

She is survived by a daughter, Betsie Ruth Johnson of Lutherville; a brother, Bennett H. Davis of Tucson, Ariz.; a granddaughter; and many nephews and nieces.

Sylvester Terry Richards, 39, chicken catcher on farm

Sylvester Terry Richards, who formerly worked on a farm as a chicken catcher, died Tuesday of kidney failure at Memorial Hospital at Easton. He was 39 and lived in Denton.

Born in Hinson, Miss., he was adopted by Zachary Eaddy and Alice Mae Custis Richards. He rounded up chickens for slaughter at Prettyman Farms in Preston until about five years ago when he became too ill to work.

Mr. Richards was married in 1992 to Carol L. Darnell of Pasadena, who survives him, along with his father, Zachary Eaddy of Federalsburg; and three daughters, Teanna Richards, Tyeshia Richards and Tekia Richards, all of Pasadena.

Funeral services were Saturday.

Other survivors include three brothers, Lewis Richards Jr. of Federalsburg, Raymond Custis of Newport News, Va., and Zackares Eaddy Jr. of Denton; six sisters, Joyce Eaddy of Preston, Felicia Walker of Fort Lauderdale, Fla., Linda Skinner of Cambridge, and Bessie Eaddy, Gloria Lawson and Carolyn Eaddy, all of Federalsburg.

Obituaries

Because of limited space and the large number of requests for obituaries, The Sun regrets that it cannot publish all the obituaries it receives. Because The Sun regards obituaries as news, we give a preference to those submitted within 48 hours of a person's death. It is also our intention to run obituaries no later than seven days after death.

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