Valentine M. Marziale, 80, owned Pastore's Grocery...

April 02, 2000

Valentine M. Marziale, 80, owned Pastore's Grocery

Valentine Michael Marziale, former owner of a popular Clifton Park Italian sub shop, died Thursday of kidney failure at Good Samaritan Hospital. He was 80.

A longtime resident of the Bel Air-Edison neighborhood in Northeast Baltimore, he owned Pastore's Grocery Store in the 3200 block of Belair Road.

He operated the business, known for its Italian submarine sandwiches and hot green olives, from 1956 until 1989, when he sold the business and retired.

Born and raised in Little Italy, Mr. Marziale attended Baltimore public schools through the eighth grade, then left to help support his family.

During World War II, he served in the 5th Armhe Cataneo Line Service, which tied up ships arriving in the Port of Baltimore.

Mr. Marziale was an avid reader and gardener.

He was a communicant of St. Leo's Roman Catholic Church, Stiles and Exeter streets, where a Mass of Christian burial will be offered at 9: 30 a.m. Tuesday.

He is survived by his wife of 53 years, the former Shirley Pastore; a son, Lee Paul Marziale of Abingdon; and four grandsons.

Mary Turner Dyson, 65, private nurse, travel agent

Mary Turner Dyson, a privaty Association.

She nursed patients for many years. She also worked for the Adventures in Travel agency in North Baltimore and as an accountant.

Born in Baltimore, the former Mary Terry was raised in Sandtown. She was a graduate of Northwestern Academy in Pine Forge, Pa. She also held a degree in nursing from Community College of Baltimore.

In 1951, she married Robert P. Turner Sr. Their marriage ended in divorce. In 1991, she married Hodges H. Dyson, who died in 1997.

Services will be held at 7 p.m. tomorrow at New Trinity Congregational Church of America, 3204 Presstman St., where she was a member.

She is survived by two sons, Leon W. Terry and Robert P. Turner Jr., and three daughters, Patricia A. Chase, Helen T. Williams and Noleda D. Smith, all of Baltimore; a stepsister, Denise Dorsey of New York; and 14 grandchildren.

Edward B. Davison, 76, 29-year Army veteran

Edward B. Davison, a longtime Laurel resident who served in the Army for nearly three decades, died March 26 of heart failure at his home in Conway, Ark. He was 76.

Mr. Davison was moving to his new home in Arkansas when he was stricken.

Drafted into the Army in 1943, he served with the Signal Corps during the Philippines campaign. He was wounded and received a Purple Heart. Mr. Davison stayed in the Army after the war and in 1954 transferred to the Medical Supply Corps. He retired in 1972 with the rank of sergeant.

Born and raised in East Baltimore, he was a graduate of city public schools.

After retiring from the Army, he worked for Nob Hill Mattress Co. in Laurel, retiring a second time in 1976.

He was a member of the Disabled American Veterans, Veterans of Foreign Wars Bowie Post 8065 and the American Legion.

Services will be private.

He is survived by his wife of 46 years, the former Simone "Yvonne" Guillou; a son, Edward M. Davison of Stafford, Va.; a daughter, Frances Goatcher of Conway, Ark.; four brothers, John Davison of Baltimore, Joseph Davison of Naples, Fla., Francis Davison of Rock Hall and Walter Davison of Hanover, Pa.; a sister, Theresa Longo of Bel Air; and three grandchildren.

Rachel Marie McPartland, 9 months, of Arbutus

Nine-month-old Rachel Marie McPartland died Thursday of heart and respiratory failure at St. Agnes HealthCare.

Services will be at 6 p.m. today at Ambrose Funeral Home, 1328 Sulphur Spring Road, Arbutus, preceded by visiting hours from 3 p.m. to 5 p.m.

She is survived by her parents, Patrick and Debra McPartland, and brother Alex McPartland of Arbutus; and grandparents Ernest and Marie Phillips of Mechanicsburg, Pa., and Jeff and Joan McPartland of Camp Hill, Pa.

The family suggests memorial contributions in Rachel's name to: United Cerebral Palsy of Central Maryland Inc., 1700 Reisterstown Road, Pikesville 21208.

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