Stadium Place plan is winner

URBAN LANDSCAPE

Concept: The village that is to go on the old 33rd Street ballpark site is chosen to receive a national award for architectural design.

March 23, 2000|By Edward Gunts | Edward Gunts,SUN STAFF

THE START of construction is more than a year off, but the urban village planned for Baltimore's Memorial Stadium property has won a national award for architectural design.

Stadium Place, a $45 million community for older adults that will contain 404 residences and a wide range of recreational amenities, was selected to receive a silver award in the Best of Seniors' Housing program sponsored this year by the National Council on Seniors Housing and the National Association of Home Builders.

The project, developed by Govans Ecumenical Development Corp. and Presbyterian Homes Inc., is scheduled for construction on East 33rd Street in the summer of 2001, after the stadium is razed.

Besides affordable residences, the plan calls for a YMCA, stores and medical offices to strengthen the development's connection with the surrounding community.

The award was presented to Marks Thomas & Associates, the Baltimore-based firm that designed the master plan for the community and will be the architects for the housing.

In selecting Stadium Place for an award, the judges praised the development team's method of taking "what was once a sports playing field in the heart of an existing community" and turning it into a seniors living facility, by preserving the outline of the old playing field as recreational space in the center of the development. They also commended the integration of the YMCA, stores and medical offices with the area.

"This is a project that was once only a vision, and now after careful research and planning, will soon be a reality," said the Rev. John Sharp, president of the development corporation board. "We're honored that the National Council on Seniors' Housing and also the National Association of Home Builders share our belief that this project is an award winner and that it will benefit the people of Baltimore."

Peter Doo combines practice with Grimm and Parker

Peter C. Doo, a Baltimore architect who has specialized in educational and residential projects in Maryland for 20 years, has combined his practice with Grimm and Parker Architects of Calverton, Md., and McLean, Va.

Doo will head a Baltimore office for Grimm and Parker, an architectural and engineering company with a staff of 65. Initial projects of the new studio include a housing development for the Reservoir Hill section of Baltimore and work for the Archdiocese of Baltimore.

Design, architecture events fill bill around Baltimore

The Jimmy Bruno Bobby Watson Quartet will perform at 8 p.m. Friday at Zion Church, Gay and Lexington streets, as part of the "Jazz in Cool Places" series. Tickets cost $20 at the door.

Attorney John Murphy, who has represented Baltimore Heritage and Preservation Maryland in their efforts to prevent widespread demolition on the west side of downtown Baltimore, will lead a panel discussion about west-side development during a free noontime forum Wednesday at the Johns Hopkins University's Downtown Center, Charles and Saratoga streets.

Members of the Midtown Community Benefits District will hold their annual Town Meeting at 7 p.m. March 30 at the University of Baltimore Business Center on West Mount Royal Avenue. Design consultant Charles Duff will discuss "Implementing the Midtown Plan."

Enrique Norten, a partner of TEN Arquitectos in Condesa, Mexico, will discuss his work during a lecture at 6 p.m. April 5 at the Baltimore Museum of Art, 10 Art Museum Drive. Tickets are $12 at the door.

New York-based architect Rafael Vinoly, designer of Philadelphia's new performing arts center and other public projects, will discuss his latest work during a free lecture at 8 p.m. April 7 at the University of Maryland School of Architecture Auditorium in College Park.

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