Crowning glories: Art for a confident few Wouldn't it...

STYLE FILE

February 20, 2000|By Maria Blackburn | Maria Blackburn,Sun Staff

Crowning glories: Art for a confident few

Wouldn't it be swell to be queen for a day? Now you can be the queen of kitsch for a day or even a year by wearing your very own head-art crown, cap or headband ornamented with doll parts, paste jewels, shards of Mylar pompons, Christmas decorations, pipe cleaners, pinwheels and whatever else strikes Federal Hill artist Linnie Greene's fancy.

Head art is not for the timid. "They're for people who love to enjoy life and have a good time," Greene explains as she tries on a headband decorated with a semi-naked doll swathed in a feathery hula skirt.

Head art started as just another form of creative expression for Greene, who usually hand-colors black and white photographs. "Now it's almost a form of art therapy," says Greene, who has transformed her small kitchen into a haberdashery workshop. There she turns out headbands bearing Barbie dolls in purple tulle and black baseball caps adorned with Jesus figurines and tinkly bells.

Head-art prices range from $15 to $50, and Greene does designs to order for bachelorette parties, baby showers, birthdays or any occasion. Call her at 410-234-8365.

Greene's creations are available at Something Else, 1611 Sulgrave Ave. in Mount Washington Village, and for a limited time at the American Visionary Art Museum's gift shop in preparation for the museum's March 4 Mardi Gras party.

Baby needs a new, free pair of shoes

Payless ShoeSource wants to give every baby born in 2000 his or her first pair of shoes for free. That's right, without cost, complimentary, gratis.

The company expects to distribute more than two million pairs of pastel-pink, baby-blue and white canvas sneakers, sized birth to 6 months, by the end of the year under their Baby's First Shoes program. All parents need to do is go to the store and fill out a registration form, and baby gets a new pair of shoes.

Why? Because the company wants parents to know how important it is for children, even tiny ones, to have well-fitted, well-constructed shoes.

Now there's only one question: Do infants really need shoes? -- M.B.

Sweet scent of Agree

Every bottle of shampoo comes packaged in promises. This shampoo will be different from the rest. This shampoo will make your hair shiny, soft and voluminous.

The promises rarely pan out. After all, all shampoos do the same thing: They clean hair. What you rinse, lather and repeat with really doesn't matter. What matters, according to consumers, is how that shampoo smells.

According to a recent study conducted by International Flavors and Fragrances, 93 percent of consumers consider shampoo fragrance important.

Which is why you might want to take a whiff of Agree shampoo the next time you're in the shampoo aisle at your local drug store. Agree won the 1999 Perfumer's Choice Award from the American Society of Perfumers for its scent -- a fruity floral fragrance somewhat evocative of Juicyfruit gum. It's sweet, but not overly, and it smells clean, too. -- M.B.

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