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Featured Articles from the Baltimore Sun

NEWS
By Joe Nawrozki and Joe Nawrozki,SUN STAFF | October 28, 2004
A standing joke around the well-appointed office suite of U.S. Army Maj. Gen. John C. Doesburg is that he was 4 inches taller when he enlisted 35 years ago. Considering the general's 350 parachute jumps - and the cumulative shock to his body meeting Earth - it is easy to see that the humor contains a large measure of admiration. Doesburg, commander of the Army Research, Development and Engineering Command at Aberdeen Proving Ground, will retire today from the military. At 57, he takes with him the satisfaction of forming and directing a unit that dreamed up and built a new generation of war gadgetry - and of working to better shield American troops in Humvees in Iraq.
SPORTS
By Matt Vensel, The Baltimore Sun | February 11, 2012
With NFL dreams and sleepy eyes, small-school standouts, practice-squad castoffs and a pack of unknown draft hopefuls stepped onto the Ravens' indoor practice field Saturday morning. For many of them, it was the closest they will come to playing in the NFL. But it was an opportunity that didn't exist for relative no-names like themselves two years ago. The NFL conducted one of its 11 regional combines at Ravens headquarters in Owings Mills on Saturday. More than 130 under-the-radar NFL prospects - most with ties to the region - slipped on cleats and squeezed into compression shorts, hoping to earn an invitation to the NFL Super Regional Combine on March 30-31 at Detroit's Ford Field and potentially catch the attention of professional scouts.
NEWS
By Robert B. Reich | August 15, 2013
Why is the nation more bitterly divided today than it's been in 80 years? Why is there more anger, vituperation and political polarization now than even during Joe McCarthy's anti-communist witch hunts of the 1950s, the tempestuous struggle for civil rights in the 1960s, the divisive Vietnam War, or the Watergate scandal? If anything, you'd think this would be an era of relative calm. The Soviet Union has disappeared and the Cold War is over. The civil rights struggle continues, but at least we now have a black middle class and even a black president.
NEWS
By Kathy Lally and Kathy Lally,SUN STAFF | April 13, 2003
When the strong and feared seize power, those eager to prove their allegiance are quick to glorify the leader with statues on every square and portraits in every office. When the strongman falls, so do his statues. The giant statue of President Saddam Hussein in the center of Baghdad, Iraq, was toppled Wednesday. It was hollow inside, somehow symbolic even though such a large statue, made out of metal, would be too heavy to erect if it were not. Still, as one Russian writer has observed, when the Soviet Union was collapsing, it took hours for a Moscow crowd equipped with heavy-duty cranes to pull down the statue of Felix Dzerzhinsky, founder of the secret police.
SPORTS
By SUN STAFF | April 26, 1997
CHICAGO -- There was an air of confidence that the Washington Bullets carried into the first game of their playoff series against the Chicago Bulls. Confidence based in part from a victory over Chicago earlier this month, and in part from two losses by a combined five points.But the Bullets found out in their first postseason appearance since 1988 that playoff basketball is totally different."Our guys probably had never seen this many media," said Bullets coach Bernie Bickerstaff. "We experienced a little bit of everything.
SPORTS
By Roch Kubatko and Roch Kubatko,SUN STAFF | March 22, 2003
FORT LAUDERDALE, Fla. - With the Orioles' season opener nine days away, they've finally found someone to assist in broadcasting their televised games. Buck Martinez has been hired as an analyst for broadcasts on Comcast SportsNet and the Orioles Television Network. He replaces Mike Flanagan, who was hired in December as vice president of baseball operations. A former manager with the Toronto Blue Jays, Martinez will join play-by-play man Michael Reghi and analyst Jim Palmer. "We're excited to add Buck to our television announcing team," said Joe Foss, vice chairman and chief operating officer.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Michael Sragow, The Baltimore Sun | July 8, 2010
"Mickey One," this week's oddly riveting revival choice at the Charles, carries the name of a production company, Tatira, that would never be credited again. It was a company that the movie's star, Warren Beatty, set up for this one movie. He named it for his mother, Kathlyn, nicknamed Tat, and his father, Ira Beaty (just one t). They brought their kids up in Virginia. But they actually met in Lutherville. Yes, the same suburb that gave us John Waters can also claim some ownership of Warren Beatty.
NEWS
By Jay Apperson and Jay Apperson,SUN STAFF | February 4, 2000
CUMBERLAND -- John A. Miller IV, described by prosecutors as a "highly motivated predator" who lured a Carroll County girl to her death, was convicted yesterday of murder and sexual assault, setting the stage for a death penalty hearing next week. Miller, 27, was found guilty of first-degree murder, a first-degree sexual offense, robbery and false imprisonment in the strangling of 17-year-old Shen D. Poehlman in Reisterstown in July 1998. The defense had conceded that Miller killed the girl but had fought the sexual-assault and robbery allegations, knowing that prosecutors needed those convictions to pursue the death penalty.
NEWS
By Susan Reimer and Susan Reimer,Sun Staff | May 16, 2004
Dani Mazzilli is talking on the phone and the melodic b-l-i-i-n-n-g-g in the background betrays the fact that she is also online, instant-messaging someone else. Suddenly, her cell phone rings, adding to the chorus, and she interrupts two conversations to begin a third with one of her three teen-aged children. Yes, she will bring the equipment bag to school that the child left at home that morning. She will be at school anyway, she says, working on the '70s dance. "Now where were we?"
NEWS
By Erik Maza, The Baltimore Sun | March 9, 2012
A student group at Towson University has again drawn criticism from other students who claim it is racist. But school administrators say they won't be taking any action against the group. On Saturday night, members of Youth for Western Civilization chalked messages that included the words "White Pride" at several locations on campus, including the Student Union and Freedom Square, said its president, Matthew Heimbach. When discovered Monday, the messages angered other students.
BUSINESS
By Hanah Cho and Hanah Cho,Sun reporter | April 26, 2007
The Merrill family said yesterday that it is transferring controlling ownership of The Capital and other newspapers to Landmark Communications Inc., ending family control of the Annapolis media company that spanned nearly four decades. As part of the deal, Landmark will swap its ownership in the Washingtonian magazine for full control of the newspaper properties. In exchange, the Merrill family will gain 100 percent ownership of the Washingtonian. Landmark, publisher of The Virginian-Pilot, owned 49.9 percent of Capital-Gazette Communications that the Merrill family did not control.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | June 29, 1994
WASHINGTON -- Secretary of State Warren M. Christopher said in a statement last night that he "enthusiastically" welcomed it. National Security Adviser Anthony Lake insisted in an interview yesterday that he supported it from the moment the president told him about it.But in the corridors of the State Department, and even parts of the White House, there is anxiety about the appointment of David R. Gergen as a "special adviser" to both Mr. Christopher and...
FEATURES
By Holly Selby and Holly Selby,SUN ARTS WRITER | February 28, 2002
The question, as it always is, is this: What about the bear? At Baltimore's Center Stage, it gallumphs into view, roaring and huffing, a great, blue manifestation of what must be Shakespeare's most bizarre stage direction. Blue? Yes, blue. "Exit, pursued by a bear," instructed Shakespeare in Act III, Scene 3 of The Winter's Tale. What was the Bard thinking? Did he intend for a real bear - or perhaps a man in a costume - to appear on stage? Should it be scary or amusing? Was the playwright who would become the most revered writer in the English language toying with the directors of his day, or toying with us?
FEATURES
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | February 14, 2003
What Citizen Kane was to movie lovers in 1941, The Wild Bunch was to cineastes in 1969. Its adrenaline rush of revelations seemed to explode the parameters of the screen. The director and the co-writer, Sam Peckinpah, turned the last stand of the Hole-in the-Wall Gang into a wrenching piece of early 20th-century mythology. His filmmaking both evinced and catalyzed complex feelings about the outlaws' freedom, brotherhood and professionalism, their manliness and childishness, and the way they experienced the closing of the West as Purgatory and used Latin America as an escape hatch.
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