Advertisement

Featured Articles from the Baltimore Sun

FEATURES
By Dr. Modena Wilson and Dr. Alain Joffe and Dr. Modena Wilson and Dr. Alain Joffe,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | June 25, 1996
I have a 6-year-old son in good health who has an interesting problem.For the last year or so, one of his outer ears sometimes becomes very hot to the touch and bright red. This can happen when he is resting, bouncing around or even eating. It doesn't seem to have any pattern, except that it is only one ear at a time. He doesn't have a cold or an ear infection when this happens.Someone said it is blood pressure, so I am concerned. I have asked doctors in the past who brush it off. Please let me know what you think.
SPORTS
By Jeremy Licht and Jeremy Licht,SUN STAFF | June 10, 2003
POTOMAC - It's a safe bet that golf-addicted members of the television-viewing public don't know the time or channel of America's Most Wanted, but they still know what to do when they have information on illegal activity. Duffy Waldorf became the latest victim of a zealous TV-watching golf aficionado when a call from a viewer turned into a two-shot penalty for the 17-year PGA Tour veteran during yesterday's final round at the Capital Open. Waldorf was assessed the penalty for repairing a ball mark near his line of play in the 12th fairway, costing him a solo second-place finish and $150,000 in earnings.
FEATURES
By Rob Hiaasen and Rob Hiaasen,SUN STAFF | April 8, 1996
Just when you thought he had disappeared, Gil Griggs surfaces again. The rascally Colt "Super Fan" of days gone by retired to Monkton and quietly opened a small auction house specializing in valuable documents.But Gil Griggs can't help but be in the middle of another story.He was minding his own business last month, the business of holding an auction. He had mailed out his "Signature House" catalog, which is stockpiled with Civil War documents, presidential notes and macabre fare: Letters from James Earl Ray, artwork by mass murderer John Wayne Gacy and more than two dozen letters, drawings and "comments" from Charles Manson, imprisoned for the 1969 murder of actress Sharon Tate and others.
HEALTH
By Robin Rudner, Special to The Baltimore Sun | January 30, 2012
Each week a nutritionist from the University of Maryland Medical Center provides a guest post to The Baltimore Sun's health blog Picture of Health (baltimoresun.com/pictureofhealth), which is reprinted here. This week, Robin Rudner weighs in on goal-setting. Jan. 1 has come and gone. If you made a resolution to improve your health and fitness (and you're serious this time), have you evaluated your progress? Do you have a plan? Consider SMART goal setting, an approach often used in corporate training.
FEATURES
By ROB KASPER | June 21, 1992
To eat the crab mustard, or not to eat the crab mustard, that was the question.Recently I struggled with this uncertainty. I pondered which parts of the crab I wanted to eat, and which parts I didn't.I didn't think about it too long. A half-dozen soft crabs, soon to be known as supper, were sitting on the kitchen counter. It was my job to clean them, to prepare them for cooking by snipping off unwanted parts.I removed the underside of the crab called its apron. I opened it up and removed the gills or "devil's fingers."
NEWS
By Shawn Hubler and Rebecca Trounson and Shawn Hubler and Rebecca Trounson,Los Angeles Times | July 6, 1994
LOS ANGELES -- In the beginning, she didn't even recognize him, that's how unworldly she was. "That's O. J. Simpson!" her boss at the nightclub exclaimed. She'd never heard of the guy.Later, friends and relatives would recount the episode and shake their heads. It wasn't just the naivete. By the time she married him seven years later at the age of 25, it seemed there had never been a time when the larger-than-life celebrity had not dominated her existence.Now, the man who so shaped the life of Nicole Brown Simpson has come to dominate the story of her death as well.
NEWS
By Kelly Brewington | kelly.brewington@baltsun.com | January 25, 2010
When patients are in the throes of a heart attack, there's no question that stents save lives. But for heart patients with few symptoms and less than severe artery blockage, whether to use a stent is a question with no clear-cut answer, say cardiologists. In fact, these days some heart experts say the mesh metal tubes used to keep narrowed or weakened arteries propped open are overused for blockages that can be treated just as well with medicine, a healthy diet and exercise. A recent internal review of heart patients at St. Joseph Medical Center in Towson found 369 patients received the coronary implants unnecessarily.
NEWS
By Tom Majeski and Tom Majeski,Knight-Ridder News Service | January 16, 1992
ST. PAUL, Minn. -- An 18-year-old North Dakota man whose arms were severed in a farm accident and who then sat in a bathtub so he wouldn't bleed on his mother's carpet is recovering this week after surgeons reattached his limbs.If everything continues to improve for John Thompson, whose surgery at North Memorial Medical Center in Robbinsdale, Minn., took place Saturday, his will be one of the few successful double arm reattachments in U.S. history.Infection will be a major concern for five to 10 days, hospital spokeswoman Maggie Drury said.
NEWS
By Douglas A. Beigel | April 22, 2014
A health care crisis is quietly unfolding in our nation's laboratories. This crisis has developed largely off the public's radar screen. If not resolved, it can adversely impact the lives of every American. The crisis in question: alarming shortages within the laboratory workforce. Lab testing has an estimated impact on over 70 percent of medical decisions. That percentage will grow as baby boomers retire and preventive coverage - including screening tests performed by labs - increases as part of federal health care reform.
FEATURES
By Brenda Herrmann and Brenda Herrmann,Chicago Tribune | January 25, 1993
With her eight true-crime books (some written under the name Andy Stack), Ann Rule has become a master of the genre, displaying remarkable perseverance as she tracks down every last detail and clears up each question. With so much human misery stored away in her mind, she is well-equipped to psychoanalyze her subjects to find out just why they do such terrible things.In "Everything She Ever Wanted," Ms. Rule follows the long and complicated story of two proud Southern clans, the Silers and the Allansons.
NEWS
By Joe Nawrozki and Robert A. Erlandson and Joe Nawrozki and Robert A. Erlandson,Sun Staff Writers | June 19, 1994
An article in The Sun June 19 about the unsolved murder of Sister Catherine Ann Cesnik reported that during the investigation of her disappearance on Nov. 7, 1969, Inspector Julian I. Forrest Sr., chief of detectives, had pressured investigators on behalf of the Archdiocese of Baltimore.In fact, Mr. Forrest had retired in October 1966.Col. Edwin E. Taylor, who was chief of the criminal investigation division when Sister Catherine disappeared, retired Dec. 25, 1969, just before her body was found Jan. 3, 1970, in Lansdowne.
FEATURES
By Joe Burris and Joe Burris,SUN STAFF | May 10, 2005
To lovers of Wild West folklore, he's Wyatt Earp - lawman, saloonkeeper, gambler, quick-triggered centerpiece of the legendary gunfight at the OK Corral. To Charles Earp Jr. of Catonsville and Pamela Earp Young of Ellicott City, he's cousin Wyatt. That the man who almost single-handedly defines the Wild West would have a couple of relatives in Maryland - and that those relatives would meet by coincidence - is perhaps not as far afield as it might seem. As it turns out, the Earp clan got its start in the United States when Thomas Earp Jr. of Ireland came to the Baltimore area in the 17th century as an indentured servant.
NEWS
By Janet Gilbert | November 27, 2010
Everyone loves the smell of piping-hot pizza. But no one loves the smell of a burning pizza box. Turns out, this is a difficult scent to eradicate from the home, and I've tried — even frying tilapia for dinner one evening. But the scent of flaming cardboard somehow persists. Almost all of my friends use the oven, set very low, to keep their pizzas warm in the box while they wait for their guests to arrive, for the evening news to be over or for the salad to be made. No one I know has encountered a problem with this.
NEWS
By Michael Dresser and michael.dresser@baltsun.com | December 1, 2008
Avoiding the purgatory that is Interstate 95 on a holiday weekend is not all that difficult if you're heading from Baltimore to the Northeast. Pennsylvania offers a wide choice of routes to scoot to the west of Philadelphia and invade New Jersey. Going south is more difficult.There aren't that many great options when you're heading to Richmond or beyond at peak travel times. The obvious route is to take the Capital Beltway to the Woodrow Wilson Bridge and follow I-95 south.
NEWS
By Justin Fenton, The Baltimore Sun | February 17, 2014
A man fatally shot by police in Morrell Park last week refused orders to drop a .357-caliber revolver, according to court records, telling officers, "You're going to have to shoot me. " The man, 22-year-old Bernard Lofton of Parkville, was shot by officers who had been called to the 1800 block of Spence St. for a report that two men wearing police tactical vests had entered an apartment. Homicide detectives continue to investigate the shooting, and the officers are on routine suspension with pay. The account is contained within charging documents for 30-year-old Brandon Smith, of Owings Mills, who police say was with Lofton and was found hiding in the apartment's bathroom after the shooting.
Advertisement
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.