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Featured Articles from the Baltimore Sun

NEWS
By ROGER SIMON | December 2, 1994
I realize that we no longer live in an age of heroes.I realize that we must expect everyone, no matter how important they become, to let us down at one time or another.Nevertheless, today I feel a special sense of loss. I feel that my trust has been betrayed.Paula Jones has told a fib.Paula Jones is the person suing President Clinton for $700,000 because, she says, he dropped his pants and asked for sex in a Little Rock hotel room when he was governor of Arkansas.But ever since she made her accusations, Jones' own character has been under assault.
NEWS
By Craig Marine | March 17, 1995
San Francisco -- TUPAC SHAKUR is a punk. Worse than that, he's a punk masquerading as a role model.In the April issue of Vibe magazine, the rapper-turned-actor-turned-shooter speaks from jail on Rikers Island and does his best to spread enough manure to fertilize the Nebraska cornfields.Tupac Shakur, 23, who was sentenced to 4 1/2 years in prison last month on a sex-abuse charge, would have us believe that he's been freed from his "addiction" to pot-smoking, club-hopping and his "Thug Life" persona.
NEWS
By Kelly Brewington | kelly.brewington@baltsun.com | January 25, 2010
When patients are in the throes of a heart attack, there's no question that stents save lives. But for heart patients with few symptoms and less than severe artery blockage, whether to use a stent is a question with no clear-cut answer, say cardiologists. In fact, these days some heart experts say the mesh metal tubes used to keep narrowed or weakened arteries propped open are overused for blockages that can be treated just as well with medicine, a healthy diet and exercise. A recent internal review of heart patients at St. Joseph Medical Center in Towson found 369 patients received the coronary implants unnecessarily.
NEWS
By Janet Gilbert | November 27, 2010
Everyone loves the smell of piping-hot pizza. But no one loves the smell of a burning pizza box. Turns out, this is a difficult scent to eradicate from the home, and I've tried — even frying tilapia for dinner one evening. But the scent of flaming cardboard somehow persists. Almost all of my friends use the oven, set very low, to keep their pizzas warm in the box while they wait for their guests to arrive, for the evening news to be over or for the salad to be made. No one I know has encountered a problem with this.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | August 28, 1997
NEW ORLEANS -- They came in swarms in their Jeep Wranglers and sports cars to the funeral home, so unschooled in the conventions of death that many did not know how to dress. Louisiana State University offers few occasions that require a navy suit.Many in the crowd may never have been to a wake. Certainly, few had ever buried a friend.Benjamin Wynne, 20, whose wake and funeral were held here yesterday, died Monday night after drinking enough to put him six times over Louisiana's legal limit for intoxication.
NEWS
By Joe Mathews and Joe Mathews,SUN STAFF | August 25, 1996
Richard Nicolas' daughter was 2 years old, but they had never spent even a minute alone together. A Friday night outing at Golden Ring Mall would be the first time. He would take Aja to an 8 o'clock movie, "The Adventures of Pinocchio," and return her to her mother. At the last minute, when her mother wavered about letting her go, Aja was insistent."Want to see Pinocchio!" the toddler said. "Want to see Pinocchio!"They saw the movie, but that night, July 26, would be father and daughter's last together.
NEWS
By Arthur Hirsch | January 3, 2010
Friends, family and law enforcement officials came in from the cold Saturday morning to share their grief, disbelief and recollections of 11-year-old Sarah Haley Foxwell, whose body was found in a wooded patch of northern Wicomico County on Christmas Day. As about 1,600 people filed into Emmanuel Wesleyan Church, two projection screens flanking the stage showed pictures taken of the blond, blue-eyed Sarah "Haleybugs" from the time she was an...
NEWS
By Art Buchwald | December 28, 1992
I'VE just returned from Aspen even though I am not a skier. haven't skied in some of the greatest winter resorts in the world. I know that this is a terrible thing to admit. It's like saying, "I'm in sales but I don't play golf." But that's the way it is.I go to places like Aspen because I enjoy sitting in hotel lobbies in front of large fireplaces, drinking hot chocolate and talking about weather conditions on the various mountains that I haven't been on.I also like to go into town and try on ski clothes and buy Briko's snow goggles to wear over my wool cap.Occasionally I'll meet another person who doesn't ski, and then we'll throw snowballs at each other.
FEATURES
By Newsday | March 25, 1991
NEW YORK -- The couple of the '80s who split in the '90s, Donald and Ivana Trump officially brought down the curtain Saturday when they settled on the divorce deal of the decade.In discussions Friday that went from 5 p.m. to midnight, Donald and Ivana met face to face in the Park Avenue law office of Jay Goldberg, who represents Donald. Things were testy for a while. But, Mr. Goldberg said, "As with all final divorce negotiations, things started off hot, and then reason overcame emotion."In the end, the $14 million cash settlement came down to who gets the old Mercedes (Ms. Trump)
NEWS
By Ian Duncan, The Baltimore Sun | November 4, 2013
Shackled in a Baltimore courtroom and facing a 110-year sentence for murder and arson, Terrence Rollins-Bey stood defiant - talking over the judge and prosecutor in a series of outbursts. "With respect to your honor, I object to everything you're saying," he said. Rollins-Bey, 25, was the second murder defendant in a week to openly challenge the authority of Baltimore Circuit Judge Emanuel Brown. Rollins-Bey and Robert G. Moore claimed in separate trials the court lacked standing to hear their cases - a move the judge described as an attempt to frustrate the proceedings.
NEWS
By Brent Jones, Liz F. Kay and Jill Rosen and Brent Jones, Liz F. Kay and Jill Rosen,brent.jones@baltsun.com | September 16, 2009
Hours earlier, someone had broken into John Pontolillo's house and taken two laptops and a video-game console. Now it was past midnight, and he heard noises coming from the garage out back. The Johns Hopkins University undergraduate didn't run. He didn't call the police. He grabbed his samurai sword. With the 3- to 5-foot-long, razor-sharp weapon in hand, police say, Pontolillo crept toward the noise. He noticed a side door in the garage had been pried open. When a man inside lunged at him, police say, the confrontation was fatal.
TOPIC
By SCOTT SHANE | June 20, 1999
ON JULY 24, 1863, three weeks after the Battle of Gettysburg, Union officers freed the inmates of a slave trader's jail on Pratt Street near the Baltimore harbor. They found a grisly scene."In this place I found 26 men, 1 boy, 29 women and 3 infants," Col. William Birney of the U.S. Colored Troops wrote to his commanding officer. "Sixteen of the men were shackled and one had his legs chained together by ingeniously contrived locks connected by chains suspended to his waist."The slaves were confined in sweltering cells or in the bricked-in yard of "Cam- liu's slave-pen," where "no tree or shrub grows" and "the mid-day sun pours down its scorching rays," Birney wrote.
SPORTS
By Tom Keyser and Tom Keyser,SUN STAFF | June 2, 1998
NEW YORK -- He was Secretariat's best friend.But when Eddie Sweat died in April at age 59, he was destitute. His family couldn't afford to bury him.So a charitable organization paid for the funeral. And a former employer paid for Sweat's widow and two daughters to travel from their home in New York City to Sweat's home state of South Carolina.There, on April 24, a group primarily of relatives -- no one from Secretariat's inner circle was present -- gathered at Rock Hill A.M.E. Church in Vance, S.C., to bid farewell to Edward "Shorty" Sweat.
NEWS
By Joe Stumpe and Joe Stumpe,KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | February 6, 2005
Sometimes only roast beef will do. You know the kind of roast we're talking about - seasoned crust, big beefy flavor and juicy center. Not a fancy steak you can cut with a butter knife, or a pot roast braised until it's falling apart, but an honest piece of meat with flavor and texture. The problem is how to achieve this ideal roast. All too often, roast beef turns out as tough, dry, stringy and flavorless as the proverbial shoe leather. In fact, I'm convinced that's why roast beef seems to turn up on a lot fewer tables these days.
NEWS
By Lacy McCrary and Lacy McCrary,KNIGHT-RIDDER NEWS SERVICE | August 21, 1997
PHILADELPHIA - Daisy Myers vividly remembers the rocks through the windows, the taunts and name-calling and cross-burnings and the day-and-night blaring of "Old Black Joe" that greeted her arrival as a member of the first African-American family in Levittown, Pa., 40 years ago.Memories of nights, more than a week of them, in which a mob that was estimated from 200 to 1,000 people gathered along Deepgreen Lane in the Dog Hollow section screaming racial epithets,...
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