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Featured Articles from the Baltimore Sun

NEWS
By Scott Higham and Scott Higham,SUN STAFF | July 22, 1997
The once-promising career of former Baltimore County Councilman Gary Huddles came to a close yesterday when he pleaded guilty to illegally handling $840,000 for a drug dealer and one-time law client and received a two-year prison term.His hands clasped behind his back, Huddles, 58, stood in a federal courtroom in Baltimore and said he should have known better."I would just like to say I have done many things in my life of which I am very proud," he told U.S. District Judge William M. Nickerson.
FEATURES
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,Sun Television Critic | May 22, 1995
"The CBS Evening News With Dan Rather and Connie Chung" was supposed to have a local flavor for Baltimore viewers tonight. Chung was scheduled to co-anchor the broadcast from WJZ -- CBS' Baltimore affiliate -- to give the station a ratings boost on the final week of May sweeps.Instead, Rather will be anchoring alone tonight, and it looks as if Chung is out of a job altogether.CBS News President Eric Ober announced Saturday that, as of today, Rather would be anchoring alone. Furthermore, Ober said, Chung's future at the network was uncertain.
NEWS
By Kathleen Purvis and Kathleen Purvis,McClatchy-Tribune | February 27, 2008
My oven has convection-roast and convection-bake settings. I understand convection is a heat-circulating fan, but the roast vs. baking part confuses me. What difference does it make to the oven if I leave the lid off a meat pan? In food language, roast and bake really aren't different. Both are done in an open pan, usually in an oven. We refer to cooking meats and vegetables in an open pan as roasting, while cakes, cookies and pies are baked. But convection, which uses fans to circulate air, is a different beast.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith | tim.smith@baltsun.com and Baltimore Sun reporter | January 19, 2010
A half-century after his untimely death at the age of 38, celebrated tenor and movie star Mario Lanza is receiving fresh medical attention from a Baltimore doctor who takes a dim view of one of the singer's weight-loss treatments - injections of the urine of pregnant women, a controversial therapy with new followers today. Dr. Philip A. Mackowiak, vice chairman of medicine at the University of Maryland School of Medicine and director of the Medical Care Clinical Center at the Veterans Administration Hospital downtown, teamed up with Armando Cesari, Lanza's Australia-based biographer, for an article about the singer's health issues just out in The Pharos, the journal of the medical honorary society Alpha Omega Alpha.
NEWS
By Elaine Tassy and Elaine Tassy,SUN STAFF | April 12, 1996
A Harford County man was sentenced to life without parole yesterday for the fatal stabbing of a Middle River minister in a crack cocaine dispute Christmas Eve 1994.James Thomas Wood, 25, also was given a 20-year sentence for robbery by Baltimore County Circuit Judge Christian M. Kahl.Wood, who was engaged to be married and about to begin college, stabbed the Rev. Samuel N. Booth Jr. 14 times and slit his throat in the minister's trailer behind Christian Faith Tabernacle Church on Middle River Road.
NEWS
By STAN STOVALL and STAN STOVALL,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | April 2, 2006
Why me? That was my first thought upon learning that I had glaucoma, a disease that steals your vision. I had already lost most of the sight in my left eye and the damage was irreversible. I was in danger of losing the sight in my right eye, as well. "How could this be?" I asked myself. I had always prided myself on being the picture of perfect health. I ate right, was obsessed with exercise, took loads of vitamin supplements, and was a bodybuilding and weight-lifting champion. I felt great, felt no eye pain, and didn't really notice any difficulty in doing my job as a television news anchor, which, of course, requires lots of reading, both on-camera and off. But that's the tricky part about glaucoma.
NEWS
By Jill Rosen and Jill Rosen,SUN STAFF | October 29, 2004
Those wishing for a white Christmas might end up with a blue one this year. Proving that it is never too early to start fretting about snow, Baltimore announced yesterday a new weapon in its winter arsenal: blue salt. It is test-driving the blue road salt, and some green as well, not so much to fight ice but to cool people's complaints about tardy snow removal. Officials said they're frustrated each winter with people who call the city to complain that plows haven't been down their street - even when they have.
NEWS
By FREDERICK N. RASMUSSEN and FREDERICK N. RASMUSSEN,SUN REPORTER | July 22, 2006
While he was chewing on a luncheon roll and discussing the current crisis between Hezbollah and Israel at a meeting this week with world leaders at the G-8 summit in St. Petersburg, Russia, a microphone picked up President Bush using a well-known barnyard epithet with British Prime Minister Tony Blair. Presidents, who at times forget they're mere mortals like the rest of us, can be and often are vulgar and profane in private and public, like the rest of us. "With all due respect, it's like Bush has no dignity," said Russell Baker, who covered the Eisenhower administration for the New York Times, and later wrote the nationally syndicated "Observer" column until retiring in 1998.
NEWS
By Meredith Cohn and Meredith Cohn,meredith.cohn@baltsun.com | February 2, 2009
It's cold outside. And as people shovel snow, scrape car windows or just spend time in the frigid air, some find that their hands and feet become numb or painful. Better get indoors or warm up, because this could mean frostbite or, more likely, frostnip, says Dr. John Wogan, attending physician in the Department of Emergency Medicine at Greater Baltimore Medical Center. What is frostbite? Frostbite is what happens when exposure to severe cold temperatures reduces blood flow and causes ice-crystals to form inside body tissues, leading to serious, even irreversible, damage.
NEWS
By Michael James and Michael James,SUN STAFF | January 13, 1997
Staring into a video camera in the fall of 1995, 23-year-old Kimberly Spicer didn't know it but she didn't have much longer to live."What are you doing, Kim?" asked her sister, who was shooting a home video of the family's visit to their stepfather before his open-heart surgery at Harbor Hospital Center."I'm looking out the harbor window, wishing I was on the boat," said the pretty auburn-haired woman, then unemployed, struggling with a crack cocaine problem and drifting through life in lower-middle-class South Baltimore.
NEWS
By Gilbert Sandler | July 18, 1995
WHEN IT comes to news reporting, the old city-room edict is always: first, get the story; and second, get it right. When the writer gets it wrong, it's a mess. It gets the reader who knows better all upset, confuses history and puts an error in the record books. I know; I've had my share of errors.Recently, the New York Times, which is known for its excellence, included what some of us around Baltimore consider a glaring error. On Sunday, July 9, the Times published an article about Baltimore in its travel section, called "What's Doing in Baltimore," by writer Melinda Henneberger.
NEWS
By Thomas Easton and Thomas Easton,Tokyo Bureau of The Sun | May 28, 1995
FUKUOKA, JAPAN -- "I could never again wear a white smock," says Dr. Toshio Tono, dressed in a white running jacket at his hospital and recalling events of 50 years ago. "It's because the prisoners thought that we were doctors, since they could see the white smocks, that they didn't struggle. They never dreamed they would be dissected."The prisoners were eight American airmen, knocked out of the sky over southern Japan during the waning months of World War II, and then torn apart organ by organ while they were still alive.
FEATURES
By Paige Williams and Paige Williams,KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | June 1, 1998
This article is based on Montana and North Carolina court records, hearing transcripts, interviews, newspaper archives, and Charles Kuralt's books "A Life on the Road," "On the Road With Charles Kuralt" and "Charles Kuralt's America."On his sickbed in New York in the summer of 1997, Charles Kuralt thought of Montana, a place he had loved for a great many years for its natural wonders, far away from his life in the city.Down by a riverside, he built a log cabin. It reminded him of his native North Carolina, but most of all it gave him a place to disappear.
SPORTS
By John Steadman | April 6, 1994
AUGUSTA, Ga. -- Standing in awe of Augusta National Golf Club and its intrinsic splendor, while waiting in anticipation of another Masters Championship, gives reason to pause and consider what this green and glorious venue may have looked like a half-century ago during the perilous days of World War II.Augusta National, as with the rest of America, underwent emergency change. It shut down. Totally. Well, almost.In 1942, only four months after the start of the war, the course was closed for the duration.
NEWS
By John Fritze, The Baltimore Sun | November 24, 2011
Legislation drafted by Sen. Benjamin L. Cardin to update the 1917 Espionage Act has angered public disclosure advocates who say the proposal would make it harder for federal employees to expose government fraud and abuse. The bill would clarify a murky area of law to ensure that anyone who publicly leaks classified material could be prosecuted criminally, which is not necessarily the case today. The proposal also would make it illegal for government employees to violate nondisclosure agreements.
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