Advertisement

Featured Articles from the Baltimore Sun

FEATURES
By Karol V. Menzie and Randy Johnson | July 4, 1992
Installing ductwork for heating and air conditioning is a bit like putting together a huge three-dimensional jigsaw puzzle.The basic rules of the game, however, are the same, whether you're retrofitting an older house, working with new construction, or adding heating and air conditioning to a new room, attic or basement.Basic Rule No. 1: Hot air rises, cold air falls.Ducts should be installed to take maximum advantage of natural air movement. For instance, for air conditioning to work properly, air returns, the large ducts that carry air back to the central unit, need to be installed high up on the wall of each upper floor, to capture warmer air and return it for cooling.
BUSINESS
By Dean Uhler | September 29, 2002
Why does the water heater in my new house have another small tank hanging off the side of the pipe above it? That is an expansion tank installed on the water supply pipe to the water heater. Its purpose is to deal with thermal expansion of water as it heats up in the water heater - to prevent water pressure from getting too high. If water pressure gets high enough it can damage valves in plumbing fixtures, joints in supply pipes and even the water heater. Thermal expansion always occurs in water heaters.
NEWS
By John-John Williams IV and John-John Williams IV,Sun reporter | April 20, 2008
Seth Qubeck sees a future teaching in South America, but sharp back pains bring back a horrifying memory. Christine Neperud finds inspiration each day in the energy and innocence of her first-grade students. But every once in a while, the sight of some lanky young man wearing a baseball cap backward reopens deep wounds. And though Ta'Juan Hall is devoted to helping raise his 9-year-old nephew, the boy is a constant reminder of the brother Hall lost. The thread connecting the three is a brutal attack 10 years ago in Florida that left two college students from Howard County dead.
NEWS
By Gilbert Sandler | July 18, 1995
WHEN IT comes to news reporting, the old city-room edict is always: first, get the story; and second, get it right. When the writer gets it wrong, it's a mess. It gets the reader who knows better all upset, confuses history and puts an error in the record books. I know; I've had my share of errors.Recently, the New York Times, which is known for its excellence, included what some of us around Baltimore consider a glaring error. On Sunday, July 9, the Times published an article about Baltimore in its travel section, called "What's Doing in Baltimore," by writer Melinda Henneberger.
SPORTS
By Bob Raissman and Bob Raissman,New York Daily News | July 12, 1991
NEW YORK -- Cynthia Alzado knows what people will think. They will call her a vengeful ex-wife.She doesn't care.The sun was shining on the tiny back yard of her Cedarhurst, Long Island, condominium Wednesday as her mood swung from regret to relief to rage. She had known Lyle Alzado since she was a teen-ager and classmate at Lawrence High School. They had lived together for 3 1/2 years before marrying in 1985.The relationship and 15-month marriage was carried out in the fast lane. It was filled with violence.
NEWS
By Mike Klingaman and Mike Klingaman,Sun Staff Writer | June 4, 1995
She was supposed to be rubble by now, this once-mighty warship moored at a watery chop shop in South Baltimore.With most of her armored flight deck peeled away, and her weapons and electronics long gone, the USS Coral Sea seems easy prey for torch-wielding workers swarming over the huge gray carcass.But the fighting lady refuses to go quietly, or easily, to her fate: being turned into automobiles, bathroom pipes or microwave ovens."This is not a rusting hulk," says Kerry Ellis, owner of Seawitch Salvage in Fairfield.
NEWS
By Zerline A. Hughes and Zerline A. Hughes,SUN STAFF | August 13, 1999
Con artists have been trying to take Maryland restaurants to the cleaners.More than 50 restaurants statewide have fallen victim to schemes seeking money for purportedly damaged clothing within the past three weeks, according to the Restaurant Association of Maryland.Mass mailings with postmarks from Bronx, N.Y., and Tucker, Ga., were delivered to restaurants claiming damage to clothing from spilled wine or salad dressing. Each request for compensation was accompanied by a dry-cleaning bill for up to $35.Business owners including Seymour Attman, owner of Attman's Delicatessen on Lombard Street, gave copies of the fraudulent claim to the restaurant trade group -- which has collected 36 of them to give to the postal inspector's office yesterday.
SPORTS
By Jackie MacMullan and Jackie MacMullan,Boston Globe | March 31, 1991
It was never a matter of memorizing dead spots on the parquet or the way the lip of the south rim bent ever so slightly. The lighting? Nothing out of the ordinary, Andrew Toney reports. In fact, said the former Philadelphia 76ers guard, the only thing special about the creaky court on 150 Causeway Street was that it served as the stage for his most famous role: the Boston Strangler."My first step out of the locker room, I was in range," Toney says. "It was easy. I have no explanation for it. It was just easy for me to score at Boston Garden."
NEWS
By Caitlin Francke and Caitlin Francke,SUN STAFF | June 7, 2000
A 19-year-old honors student convicted of strangling his girlfriend and burying her in a shallow grave because she broke up with him was sentenced in Baltimore Circuit Court yesterday to spend the rest of his life behind bars. Adnan Masud Syed maintained his innocence at his sentencing on first-degree murder and kidnapping convictions, even as his attorney asked Judge Wanda K. Heard for mercy when punishing Syed because the killing was "a crime of passion." "He made a bad decision," Syed's attorney, Charles H. Dorsey III, told Heard.
FEATURES
By Ann LoLordo, Linell Smith and Patricia Meisol and Ann LoLordo, Linell Smith and Patricia Meisol,SUN STAFF | January 31, 2001
A year ago, Tracy Whitehead was planning how to leave her abusive relationship with Joseph Palczynski, a decision that triggered her abduction, the deaths of four bystanders and the terrorizing of her family. Yesterday she was contemplating how to spend the money she won after "shock jock" Howard Stern was moved by her horrifying story. Stern flew the Baltimore County woman to Las Vegas as the winner of a hard luck contest he advertised on radio. And on Sunday night, in a Stern-arranged bet, Whitehead won $100,000 in one hand at blackjack.
FEATURES
By Holly Selby and Holly Selby,SUN ARTS WRITER | February 28, 2002
The question, as it always is, is this: What about the bear? At Baltimore's Center Stage, it gallumphs into view, roaring and huffing, a great, blue manifestation of what must be Shakespeare's most bizarre stage direction. Blue? Yes, blue. "Exit, pursued by a bear," instructed Shakespeare in Act III, Scene 3 of The Winter's Tale. What was the Bard thinking? Did he intend for a real bear - or perhaps a man in a costume - to appear on stage? Should it be scary or amusing? Was the playwright who would become the most revered writer in the English language toying with the directors of his day, or toying with us?
NEWS
By Kathleen Purvis and Kathleen Purvis,McClatchy-Tribune | February 27, 2008
My oven has convection-roast and convection-bake settings. I understand convection is a heat-circulating fan, but the roast vs. baking part confuses me. What difference does it make to the oven if I leave the lid off a meat pan? In food language, roast and bake really aren't different. Both are done in an open pan, usually in an oven. We refer to cooking meats and vegetables in an open pan as roasting, while cakes, cookies and pies are baked. But convection, which uses fans to circulate air, is a different beast.
NEWS
By Robert S. McElvaine | August 31, 1997
IT IS GENERALLY accepted that the Civil War was the most important event in American history. Yet, as two recent controversies remind us, we disagree on what that war was about.The question of whether the nation should make a formal apology for slavery has brought forth from such authorities as former history professor Newt Gingrich and columnist George F. Will the declaration that we fought the war to end slavery.Meanwhile, across the South, where battles continue over the display of Confederate flags and related symbols, white defenders of their "heritage" argue that the Civil War was not about slavery but about states' rights and "Southern independence."
NEWS
By Kelly Brewington | kelly.brewington@baltsun.com | January 25, 2010
When patients are in the throes of a heart attack, there's no question that stents save lives. But for heart patients with few symptoms and less than severe artery blockage, whether to use a stent is a question with no clear-cut answer, say cardiologists. In fact, these days some heart experts say the mesh metal tubes used to keep narrowed or weakened arteries propped open are overused for blockages that can be treated just as well with medicine, a healthy diet and exercise. A recent internal review of heart patients at St. Joseph Medical Center in Towson found 369 patients received the coronary implants unnecessarily.
FEATURES
By Knight-Ridder News Service | June 26, 1992
Dorothy Bush LeBlond, the president's only daughter, gets married tomorrow.Not invited, huh?But since taxpayers almost certainly will pay part of the tab, you deserve to know all we've dug up on this June bride's oh-so-special day.For starters, it's the best kept secret in town."
Advertisement
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.