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Featured Articles from the Baltimore Sun

HEALTH
By Meredith Cohn, The Baltimore Sun | February 5, 2014
Putting too much stress on your joints? Or maybe arthritis has become an issue? Athletes, seniors or anyone in these categories could develop a bone spur, or extra bone produced by the body. There are some things to do at home if it causes short-term pain, and a doctor can offer suggestions if the pain doesn't stop, according to Dr. James Nace, an orthopedic surgeon with the LifeBridge Health Rubin Institute for Advanced Orthopedics and a physical therapist. What is a bone spur, and why does it form?
SPORTS
By Phil Jackman | December 10, 1992
When the doctor told Vinny Pazienza he would never figh again, maybe not even be able to walk, it was like a guy waving the red towel in front of an already enraged bull. Oh boy, a challenge."I never believed him, not even for five seconds. It never crossed my mind that I wouldn't be able to come back," says Pazienza, who had two vertebrae broken and a third dislocated high on his spinal column just 13 months ago.The thing is, Paz, broken neck and all, was back working out (in a fashion) within three months.
HEALTH
By Meredith Cohn, The Baltimore Sun | January 8, 2014
Those who have a habit of biting their lips may find that a small bluish bump has developed inside their mouth. It might disappear on its own or it might linger. Dr. Zaineb Hassan Makhzoumi, an assistant professor of dermatology at the University of Maryland School of Medicine, said they are more annoying than dangerous. But those who suffer from them may want to have them removed by a doctor. How common are mucous cysts, and why do they form? Mucous cysts, also known as mucoceles, are quite common in the general population, usually occurring on the lower lip. The majority of cases (70 percent)
FEATURES
By Carol Marie Cropper and Carol Marie Cropper,New York Times News Service | January 3, 1995
Carol Clark lost her job as president of the bank in Braselton, Ga., after it was auctioned in actress Kim Basinger's bankruptcy.Tom Brown, 76, was laid off five years ago when Ms. Basinger, in a burst of publicity, "bought" tiny Braselton, including the hardware store where he worked. Now he fears that he will lose his rented home as she and her investment partner prepare to sell off parts of the town, about 50 miles northeast of Atlanta, which they purchased with big development plans in mind.
NEWS
By Robert S. McElvaine | August 31, 1997
IT IS GENERALLY accepted that the Civil War was the most important event in American history. Yet, as two recent controversies remind us, we disagree on what that war was about.The question of whether the nation should make a formal apology for slavery has brought forth from such authorities as former history professor Newt Gingrich and columnist George F. Will the declaration that we fought the war to end slavery.Meanwhile, across the South, where battles continue over the display of Confederate flags and related symbols, white defenders of their "heritage" argue that the Civil War was not about slavery but about states' rights and "Southern independence."
FEATURES
By Glenn McNatt and Glenn McNatt,Sun Art Critic | April 18, 2007
In the art of Africa, the mask is a versatile, multipurpose facade. It may signify identity and the ancestors, politics and medicine or the invisible world of the spirits. And in whatever form a mask appears, color is integral to its meaning. Now color is the subject of the second installment of Meditations on African Art, a three-part series at the Baltimore Museum of Art that explores African art from the point of view of the people who created it. The modestly scaled show presents about 30 traditional African masks from the museum's collection arranged in four groups: red, white, black and the tricolor that incorporates all three hues.
SPORTS
By Roch Kubatko and Roch Kubatko,SUN STAFF | September 21, 1998
Ryan Minor took a few steps out of the Orioles' dugout last night, turned to look inside, then jogged slowly to third base. Perhaps he was checking to make sure no one was following him.Eleven days had passed since Minor's promotion from Double-A, and already he was treading on sacred ground. He hoped only to keep from falling.Without warning, Minor took the position that had belonged exclusively to Cal Ripken for the past two seasons, ending a consecutive-games streak that stretched to eternity.
FEATURES
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,SUN TELEVISION CRITIC | May 6, 2000
Let's take the glass-is-half-full approach to this weekend of "sweeps" programming: At least there's one production that rises to slightly above average. I'm talking about "Cupid & Cate," the 205th Hallmark Hall of Fame presentation, a made-for-TV movie that begins as a romantic comedy and ends as a family drama. While the drama part has some of the film's strongest moments, it's also where "Cupid & Cate" ultimately compromises its vision and turns to greeting-card mush. But, until that happens, you've got just under two hours of solid performances by fine actors.
NEWS
By Janet Gilbert | November 27, 2010
Everyone loves the smell of piping-hot pizza. But no one loves the smell of a burning pizza box. Turns out, this is a difficult scent to eradicate from the home, and I've tried — even frying tilapia for dinner one evening. But the scent of flaming cardboard somehow persists. Almost all of my friends use the oven, set very low, to keep their pizzas warm in the box while they wait for their guests to arrive, for the evening news to be over or for the salad to be made. No one I know has encountered a problem with this.
NEWS
By Julia Reed | October 14, 2013
“If you can walk, you can jump,” says Danny Serpico, whose new business venture relies on the fun (and vigor) of bouncing. The 31,000-square-foot Sky Zone Indoor Trampoline Park -- more trampoline than flooring -- has a lineup of activities for a variety of ages. Dodgeball, basketball and a foam pit appeal to teens and tweens for special events on Friday and Saturday nights, while toddlers get their own special jump time on Tuesday and Thursday mornings. “It's a safe environment that you can bring your family and friends,” says manager Serpico, a Columbia native.
FEATURES
By Phyllis Brill and Phyllis Brill,Evening Sun Staff | November 13, 1990
WHAT DOES it mean when you hear that a dear friend has had a heart attack and is in the hospital in critical condition? Just how bad is critical? You might call the hospital the next day and be told his condition is stable. Does that mean he is out of danger now?Perhaps you read about an accident on I-95 in which three local teen-agers are hurt. The paper says one of the passengers was hospitalized in critical condition. The next day you read that the teen's condition is guarded. Does that mean he is getting better or worse?
FEATURES
By Paige Williams and Paige Williams,KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | June 1, 1998
This article is based on Montana and North Carolina court records, hearing transcripts, interviews, newspaper archives, and Charles Kuralt's books "A Life on the Road," "On the Road With Charles Kuralt" and "Charles Kuralt's America."On his sickbed in New York in the summer of 1997, Charles Kuralt thought of Montana, a place he had loved for a great many years for its natural wonders, far away from his life in the city.Down by a riverside, he built a log cabin. It reminded him of his native North Carolina, but most of all it gave him a place to disappear.
NEWS
By Lisa Goldberg and Lisa Goldberg,SUN STAFF | July 21, 2004
Ryan T. Furlough, the Ellicott City teenager who fatally laced his best friend's soda with cyanide last year, was sentenced yesterday to life in prison by a judge who said he did not want to cut off any chance that the 19-year-old could one day earn his release. The sentence - a middle ground between life without parole, which prosecutors sought, and the shorter term requested by defense attorneys - was imposed at the end of an emotional four-hour hearing that brought a simmering debate over the use of antidepressant drugs by youths to the forefront.
NEWS
By Lisa Goldberg and Lisa Goldberg,SUN STAFF | November 30, 2001
Calling his crime "diabolical," a Howard County judge sentenced Paul Stephen Riggins, the Elkridge man convicted of killing his long-missing wife, to life in prison yesterday. Before imposing the sentence and with crying friends of Nancy Lee Riggins huddled on courtroom benches, Judge Lenore R. Gelfman noted that the killing left the couple's only child, Amanda, who turns 11 tomorrow, without either parent - and friends and family without a grave to visit. "The family has no place to mourn, no sense of closure," she said.
FEATURES
By Dr. Modena Wilson and Dr. Alain Joffe and Dr. Modena Wilson and Dr. Alain Joffe,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | February 11, 1997
My 8-year-old daughter has been coughing up blood. Otherwise, she seems fine.How worried should I be about this?Coughing up blood (called hemoptysis by doctors) should always be taken seriously.It is an unusual symptom in childhood. When it does occur, it may be a sign of a lung disease that requires treatment.Before listing some of the most common causes of hemoptysis during childhood, we want to point out that it is not always easy to tell whether the blood is coming from the lungs or the stomach, but both are important.
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