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Featured Articles from the Baltimore Sun

NEWS
By Susan Baer and Susan Baer,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | February 28, 1998
WASHINGTON -- President Clinton's private eye is no trench-coat-toting gumshoe with his feet propped on a cluttered desk and a whiskey bottle in his bottom drawer.No, Terry F. Lenzner, the aggressive lawyer-turned-sleuth who was hauled before a grand jury this week by the Whitewater independent counsel, heads one of the nation's top investigative outfits. It's a firm that has held up its magnifying glass for Fortune 500 companies, Mike Tyson, political candidates of all -- stripes, and now, the embattled Clinton White House.
NEWS
By Colin Campbell, Jessica Anderson and Peter Hermann, The Baltimore Sun | June 15, 2012
The teens were throwing rocks and ringing doorbells at random houses in their Randallstown neighborhood — mischief so common they borrowed a name long linked to pranksters' shenanigans: "knicker-knocking. " Christopher Brown had expressed disapproval of the vandalism that had residents complaining to police. But a friend said the high school junior and church usher — dubbed "Mr. Congeniality" by his teachers — reluctantly agreed to join the prowl late Wednesday. They approached a house on Susanna Road, according to a friend, who said he accompanied a separate group trailing behind Brown.
NEWS
By Justin George, The Baltimore Sun | February 5, 2013
When reporters asked Baltimore police and state agencies where the guns used in city crimes came from, no one could provide specific information. "I can tell you that the vast majority, 95 percent plus, are committed with illegal guns," Baltimore police spokesman Anthony Guglielmi said. But he didn't use data to support that widely held assumption. Local law enforcement agencies don't have that information because of a federal blockage of gun tracing data. Police also can't reveal what gun tracing data they do have because a federal law passed a decade ago shields most firearm tracking information from the public.
TOPIC
By SCOTT SHANE | June 20, 1999
ON JULY 24, 1863, three weeks after the Battle of Gettysburg, Union officers freed the inmates of a slave trader's jail on Pratt Street near the Baltimore harbor. They found a grisly scene."In this place I found 26 men, 1 boy, 29 women and 3 infants," Col. William Birney of the U.S. Colored Troops wrote to his commanding officer. "Sixteen of the men were shackled and one had his legs chained together by ingeniously contrived locks connected by chains suspended to his waist."The slaves were confined in sweltering cells or in the bricked-in yard of "Cam- liu's slave-pen," where "no tree or shrub grows" and "the mid-day sun pours down its scorching rays," Birney wrote.
SPORTS
By Drake Witham | November 7, 1995
The Cleveland Browns are the only team in the NFL named after a person, but there's some confusion as to who that person is.Call the Cleveland Plain Dealer sports department and you'll be told Paul Brown. The Official NFL Encyclopedia of Pro Football also credits the legendary first coach and general manager of the team. But according to the media relations office of the Browns, the team is named after the "Brown Bomber," boxer Joe Louis.About the only thing that seems certain is that there was a contest to name Arthur McBride's professional football team in 1946.
NEWS
By Jessica Anderson | April 1, 2010
Police have made an arrest in a deadly October stabbing that occurred after a dispute in a car near a park in East Baltimore. Larry Douglas, 20, of Baltimore has been charged with first-degree murder in the stabbing of Darren Neal Green Jr., 25, of the first block of N. Woodington Road in Southwest Baltimore. Police found the wounded Green wearing women's clothing in the 1500 block of Montpelier St., near Adams Park, in the Coldstream-Homestead-Montebello neighborhood about 5 a.m. Oct. 26. A counselor said she knew Green as "Dee," and that Green identified as a woman.
FEATURES
By Dennis McDougal and Dennis McDougal,Los Angeles Times | April 2, 1991
HOLLYWOOD Tears will flow, hearts will rend and noses will sniffle all over America tonight as CBS airs the made-for-TV movie "Triumph of the Heart: The Ricky Bell Story."The title notwithstanding, it will only be a small, somewhat fictive slice of the real Ricky Bell story. (It will be on Channel 11-WBAL at 9 p.m.)"We weren't doing the complete Ricky Bell story," said screenwriter Jeff Andrus, who spent a month last year researching the former USC football hero's life and tragic early death.
NEWS
By Douglas Birch and Douglas Birch,Staff Writer | January 11, 1993
At dawn over Guadalcanal 50 years ago, two Japanese dive bombers plunged toward the cruiser USS Helena and ran smack into the future of warfare.Until that January morning, ships without air cover were sitting ducks. Anti-aircraft fire was frustratingly inaccurate. With ammunition that exploded on impact, even the best gunners had to fire about 2,500 rounds on average to score a hit. Timed fuses that exploded a set number of seconds after firing worked a little better, but not much."Almost no one ever hit an airplane with the old-fashioned fuses," recalled Dr. James A. Van Allen, the discoverer of the Earth's radiation belt, who worked on fuses at the Applied Physics Laboratory of Johns Hopkins University during the war. "It would be just a sheer stroke of luck to hit anything."
NEWS
October 6, 2014
In 2013, I retired as the Commander of the Maryland State Police Licensing Division. Before that, I ran the Maryland State Police Firearms Enforcement Section and the Gang Enforcement Unit. I was also a homicide investigator, drug investigator and criminal investigator for most of my career. I understand crime and I understand violence. I strongly support efforts to reduce violence in the state of Maryland. But the fact is that we are not focusing on real solutions. I can assure you that bad laws do not make us any safer.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,Sun Film Critic | June 24, 1994
It's good to be the king.This is the thrust of "The Lion King," the new Disney animated feature film opening today, which wants to be about fathers and sons but can't quite break free of the fact that it's about kings and princes. Although it's state of the art, one might say that in terms of its values, it's the best animated film of the 19th century.Beautifully mounted and dynamically told, it follows Simba, Prince of the Beasts, son of the mighty Mufassa (James Earl Jones), current holder of the kingship.
FEATURES
By Alice Steinbach and Alice Steinbach,Sun Staff Writer | July 30, 1995
Dearest Anne:For weeks even months I have been praying only that I be shown what I must do. This morning with no warning I was Shown as clearly as I was shown that Friday night in August, 1955, that you would be my wife. ... And like Abraham, I dare not go without my child. Know that I love thee but must act. ...NormanOn the last afternoon of his life Norman R. Morrison stopped somewhere between Baltimore and Washington to mail a letter to his wife.The evening rush hour was in full swing that chilly Tuesday on Nov. 2, 1965, when Norman, driving an old, borrowed Cadillac with his infant daughter behind him in a car crib and a gallon jug of kerosene beside him in a wicker picnic basket, paused briefly to post the handwritten, one-page letter.
NEWS
By Susan Reimer and Susan Reimer,Sun Staff | May 16, 2004
Dani Mazzilli is talking on the phone and the melodic b-l-i-i-n-n-g-g in the background betrays the fact that she is also online, instant-messaging someone else. Suddenly, her cell phone rings, adding to the chorus, and she interrupts two conversations to begin a third with one of her three teen-aged children. Yes, she will bring the equipment bag to school that the child left at home that morning. She will be at school anyway, she says, working on the '70s dance. "Now where were we?"
NEWS
By S. M. KHALID | October 27, 1991
Last week, a reputed 18-year-old drug kingpin, Anthony Jones, was arrested in East Baltimore. Police said a multi-million-dollar organization was organized when Mr. Jones was a juvenile and used children as young as 11 years old as street dealers.Over the last 20 years, according to prosecutors and police, local drug dealers have grown progressively younger and more dangerous, as the appetite of city drug addicts continues to switch increasingly from heroin to cocaine.During the reign of the "old school" traffickers -- mature adults -- heroin was Baltimore's drug of choice.
NEWS
By E.J. Fagan | November 25, 2013
U.S. law enforcement officials have been shutting down giant illegal marketplaces that do business in "bitcoin" and are beginning to lay out plans to regulate such digital currencies - like we do any other kind of money - by requiring that money laundering controls be applied to the transactions. The virtual bitcoin currency is not backed by any central bank or government and can be transferred "peer to peer" between any two people anywhere. It is created through a complex computer mining process that allows people to earn new bitcoins by solving certain mathematical problems.
NEWS
Susan Reimer | January 31, 2011
Childhood immunizations are victims of their own success. The dreadful diseases against which they protect our children are distant memories. We have forgotten polio, or that measles, mumps and rubella — the MMR of vaccine language — could cause deafness, blindness, brain damage or seizures. So, in 1998, when a British study purported to link the mysterious condition known as autism to those vaccinations, it was easy for parents to decide to err on the side of caution. More recently, as we became obsessed with the pesticides used to grow our food and the additives used to preserve its flavors, the unknown concoction of drugs injected into our newborns was one more thing to be suspicious of, to be fearful of. One more thing we believe we can safely live without.
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