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Featured Articles from the Baltimore Sun

NEWS
By Jacques Kelly and Jacques Kelly,SUN STAFF | March 18, 1997
A 31-year-old woman lay near death from cervical cancer when a Johns Hopkins research doctor made a stunning observation about a pea-sized tumor biopsy section surgically removed from her body. It was a discovery that would make her immortal.It was the early fall of 1951, and for the first time in scientific practice, human cells were living outside the body in a glass tube. The cells of this Turners Station mother of five could be tested, treated and studied, opening up whole avenues of biological research.
NEWS
By Janet Gilbert | November 27, 2010
Everyone loves the smell of piping-hot pizza. But no one loves the smell of a burning pizza box. Turns out, this is a difficult scent to eradicate from the home, and I've tried — even frying tilapia for dinner one evening. But the scent of flaming cardboard somehow persists. Almost all of my friends use the oven, set very low, to keep their pizzas warm in the box while they wait for their guests to arrive, for the evening news to be over or for the salad to be made. No one I know has encountered a problem with this.
NEWS
By Lisa Goldberg and Lisa Goldberg,SUN STAFF | November 30, 2001
Calling his crime "diabolical," a Howard County judge sentenced Paul Stephen Riggins, the Elkridge man convicted of killing his long-missing wife, to life in prison yesterday. Before imposing the sentence and with crying friends of Nancy Lee Riggins huddled on courtroom benches, Judge Lenore R. Gelfman noted that the killing left the couple's only child, Amanda, who turns 11 tomorrow, without either parent - and friends and family without a grave to visit. "The family has no place to mourn, no sense of closure," she said.
FEATURES
By David Folkenflik and David Folkenflik,SUN TELEVISION WRITER | May 7, 2003
Bob Turk is a nice guy. A very nice guy. Everybody says so. "I can't even remember what he reports -- he's just part of the fiber of the city," says Maggie Miceli, 30, a native Baltimorean who currently lives in Washington. "He's been on television as long as I've been alive." Chris Godwin, a 23-year-old security guard from Baltimore, describes Turk this way: "He's just a typical person like you or I." You don't have to take their word for it. Executives at several local stations say surveys consistently show the cheerful Turk -- WJZ's weather forecaster for the past 30 years -- among the most popular people on the city's airwaves.
FEATURES
By Karol V. Menzie and Randy Johnson | September 4, 1993
Remember back in grade school when you were first learning to multiply and divide? Even though the problems all dealt with colliding trains and people who seemed to have a lot of fruit on their hands, the teacher promised this was real practical stuff that you'd need later on.Well, the teacher was right -- at least, if there's a stair-building project in your future.Building stairs is an art form perfected by carpenters over the centuries. There is a lot of conventional wisdom about what makes stairs comfortable and practical.
NEWS
By Justin Fenton, The Baltimore Sun | January 7, 2013
As a federal judge handed down a sentence that will virtually ensure Perry Roark spends the rest of his life behind bars, the founder of Maryland's largest home-grown prison gang renounced his association with the group. Roark, a hulking man known as "Rock," was sentenced to life in a prison Monday for his role in creating Dead Man Inc., an organization of white inmates that prosecutors said has since spread to other states and led to street violence throughout the Baltimore region.
NEWS
By Joe Mathews and Joe Mathews,SUN STAFF | August 25, 1996
Richard Nicolas' daughter was 2 years old, but they had never spent even a minute alone together. A Friday night outing at Golden Ring Mall would be the first time. He would take Aja to an 8 o'clock movie, "The Adventures of Pinocchio," and return her to her mother. At the last minute, when her mother wavered about letting her go, Aja was insistent."Want to see Pinocchio!" the toddler said. "Want to see Pinocchio!"They saw the movie, but that night, July 26, would be father and daughter's last together.
NEWS
By Jim Haner and Jim Haner,SUN STAFF | April 3, 2000
Jacqueline Jenkins-Nye, who was recruited out of Goucher College by the Navy to help crack codes used by the Japanese and Germans during World War II, but whose contribution to science might be more recognized by children who have seen her television-personality son, died Thursday. The Baltimore native was 79. She died at George Washington Hospital in Washington of cancer. Long a resident of Arlington, Va., the mother of three was born in Durham, N.C. She moved to Baltimore at an early age, when her father accepted a position as a chemistry professor at the Johns Hopkins University.
NEWS
By Darren M. Allen and Darren M. Allen,Staff Writer | April 28, 1993
A 53-year-old northeast Carroll county man was sentenced yesterday to eight years in state prison for sexually abusing three neighborhood children over four years.Carroll Circuit Judge Raymond E. Beck Sr. sentenced the defendant to 15 years for child abuse and eight years each for two counts of battery. The man's name is being withheld to protect the children's privacy.His victims were two boys and a girl, court records show.Judge Beck suspended all but eight years of the sentence and ordered the defendant to serve five years of supervised probation after his release from prison.
FEATURES
By Karol V. Menzie and Randy Johnson | July 4, 1992
Installing ductwork for heating and air conditioning is a bit like putting together a huge three-dimensional jigsaw puzzle.The basic rules of the game, however, are the same, whether you're retrofitting an older house, working with new construction, or adding heating and air conditioning to a new room, attic or basement.Basic Rule No. 1: Hot air rises, cold air falls.Ducts should be installed to take maximum advantage of natural air movement. For instance, for air conditioning to work properly, air returns, the large ducts that carry air back to the central unit, need to be installed high up on the wall of each upper floor, to capture warmer air and return it for cooling.
NEWS
By JO-ANN PILARDI | June 7, 2006
The immigration debates always focus on small brown bodies jumping fences and scooting through the brush of our Southwestern states (land that was Mexico about 150 years ago). Our self-righteous anger at those brown bodies is fueled by our narrow use of the word "illegal" - a term reserved only for those immigrant workers. Yet aren't there other "illegals" hiding in the American underbrush, and isn't it time to add to the American immigration lexicon a new term? But where are those other "illegals" - the illegal employers of the illegal workers?
NEWS
November 29, 2000
A TWO-YEAR restoration effort was recently completed at the 150-year-old African-American Ellsworth Cemetery near Westminster in Carroll County. Unknown to most of those who were doing the restoring, the remains of Laurel Cemetery, Baltimore's famous African-American burial ground, also lie within their county. During the first half of the 19th century, the majority of Baltimore's black population was buried in "colored burial grounds" owned by local churches. Many of the burial sites were near Gay Street, between Chase and Lanvale streets.
NEWS
By Joan Jacobson and Joan Jacobson,SUN STAFF | March 10, 1998
Keenan Kester Cofield is the man who sued too much.In Alabama he sued his guards while in prison and the Burger King where he ate on work release. And in Tennessee he sued a newspaper in which he placed his own obituary.Last year, after moving to Maryland, Cofield -- whom one federal judge labeled "a gadfly and an exploiter of the court system" -- began testing the patience of Baltimore County's court system as well, this time using the name Lord Keenan Kester Cofield.After he and his wife were refused extra sauce for their chicken nuggets, they sued McDonald's Corp.
FEATURES
By Holly Selby and Holly Selby,SUN ARTS WRITER | February 28, 2002
The question, as it always is, is this: What about the bear? At Baltimore's Center Stage, it gallumphs into view, roaring and huffing, a great, blue manifestation of what must be Shakespeare's most bizarre stage direction. Blue? Yes, blue. "Exit, pursued by a bear," instructed Shakespeare in Act III, Scene 3 of The Winter's Tale. What was the Bard thinking? Did he intend for a real bear - or perhaps a man in a costume - to appear on stage? Should it be scary or amusing? Was the playwright who would become the most revered writer in the English language toying with the directors of his day, or toying with us?
HEALTH
By Meredith Cohn, The Baltimore Sun | February 5, 2014
Putting too much stress on your joints? Or maybe arthritis has become an issue? Athletes, seniors or anyone in these categories could develop a bone spur, or extra bone produced by the body. There are some things to do at home if it causes short-term pain, and a doctor can offer suggestions if the pain doesn't stop, according to Dr. James Nace, an orthopedic surgeon with the LifeBridge Health Rubin Institute for Advanced Orthopedics and a physical therapist. What is a bone spur, and why does it form?
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