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Featured Articles from the Baltimore Sun

HEALTH
By Meredith Cohn, The Baltimore Sun | January 8, 2014
Those who have a habit of biting their lips may find that a small bluish bump has developed inside their mouth. It might disappear on its own or it might linger. Dr. Zaineb Hassan Makhzoumi, an assistant professor of dermatology at the University of Maryland School of Medicine, said they are more annoying than dangerous. But those who suffer from them may want to have them removed by a doctor. How common are mucous cysts, and why do they form? Mucous cysts, also known as mucoceles, are quite common in the general population, usually occurring on the lower lip. The majority of cases (70 percent)
HEALTH
By Meredith Cohn, The Baltimore Sun | February 5, 2014
Putting too much stress on your joints? Or maybe arthritis has become an issue? Athletes, seniors or anyone in these categories could develop a bone spur, or extra bone produced by the body. There are some things to do at home if it causes short-term pain, and a doctor can offer suggestions if the pain doesn't stop, according to Dr. James Nace, an orthopedic surgeon with the LifeBridge Health Rubin Institute for Advanced Orthopedics and a physical therapist. What is a bone spur, and why does it form?
NEWS
By Stephanie Shapiro and Stephanie Shapiro,SUN STAFF | April 17, 1998
Sharon Fenick first heard the figure of speech "rule of thumb" cited as a sexist pejorative during her freshman year at Harvard seven years ago.The phrase was invoked in a lecture as an example of domestic abuse permitted by British common law. The rule of thumb, according to the professor, was a law that allowed a man to beat his wife so long as the rod used was no thicker than his thumb. But over the centuries, the term had evolved into vernacular for an "approximate measure.""It sounded very believable to me," says the 24-year-old Fenick, now in her third year of law school at the University of Chicago.
FEATURES
By Glenn McNatt and Glenn McNatt,Sun Art Critic | April 18, 2007
In the art of Africa, the mask is a versatile, multipurpose facade. It may signify identity and the ancestors, politics and medicine or the invisible world of the spirits. And in whatever form a mask appears, color is integral to its meaning. Now color is the subject of the second installment of Meditations on African Art, a three-part series at the Baltimore Museum of Art that explores African art from the point of view of the people who created it. The modestly scaled show presents about 30 traditional African masks from the museum's collection arranged in four groups: red, white, black and the tricolor that incorporates all three hues.
NEWS
By Robert S. McElvaine | August 31, 1997
IT IS GENERALLY accepted that the Civil War was the most important event in American history. Yet, as two recent controversies remind us, we disagree on what that war was about.The question of whether the nation should make a formal apology for slavery has brought forth from such authorities as former history professor Newt Gingrich and columnist George F. Will the declaration that we fought the war to end slavery.Meanwhile, across the South, where battles continue over the display of Confederate flags and related symbols, white defenders of their "heritage" argue that the Civil War was not about slavery but about states' rights and "Southern independence."
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | February 9, 1995
LOS ANGELES -- A man who lived near Nicole Brown Simpson told jurors yesterday how, shortly before midnight June 12, Mrs. Simpson's nervous, purposeful pet Akita dog pulled him toward its owner's condominium, stopped in front and peered into the yard.HTC When the neighbor looked for himself, he said, he saw Mrs. Simpson prostrate and "full of blood.""I turned to my wife and said there was a dead person there," the witness, Sukru Boztepe, told Marcia Clark, the chief prosecutor in the case.
NEWS
By Lisa Goldberg and Lisa Goldberg,SUN STAFF | November 30, 2001
Calling his crime "diabolical," a Howard County judge sentenced Paul Stephen Riggins, the Elkridge man convicted of killing his long-missing wife, to life in prison yesterday. Before imposing the sentence and with crying friends of Nancy Lee Riggins huddled on courtroom benches, Judge Lenore R. Gelfman noted that the killing left the couple's only child, Amanda, who turns 11 tomorrow, without either parent - and friends and family without a grave to visit. "The family has no place to mourn, no sense of closure," she said.
FEATURES
By Karol V. Menzie and Randy Johnson | September 4, 1993
Remember back in grade school when you were first learning to multiply and divide? Even though the problems all dealt with colliding trains and people who seemed to have a lot of fruit on their hands, the teacher promised this was real practical stuff that you'd need later on.Well, the teacher was right -- at least, if there's a stair-building project in your future.Building stairs is an art form perfected by carpenters over the centuries. There is a lot of conventional wisdom about what makes stairs comfortable and practical.
NEWS
By Sheridan Lyons and Sheridan Lyons,Staff Writer | May 18, 1993
Rejecting an "evil twin" defense, an angry Baltimore County judge gave the supposedly "good" twin life without parole yesterday for murdering a 15-year-old runaway last June after the brothers raped and sodomized her."You are a dangerous human being," Circuit Judge James T. Smith Jr. told Tyrone Page, 36, at times raising his voice and pounding to emphasize his points.Page and his identical twin brother, Jerome, lived off and on with their mother in the 2100 block of Monumental Ave. in Halethorpe, not far from the victim's home in the 2000 block of Putnam Ave.Amanda Lee Hall, a 10th-grader at Lansdowne High School, ran away from home last June 1, after a dispute over a boyfriend.
NEWS
By Freeman A. Hrabowski III | December 22, 2013
A recent New York Times illustration read, "COLLEGE IS FOR SUCKERS. " The words were emblazoned across the sweatshirts of four students, and the accompanying article made essentially that point. It echoed an increasingly common refrain that college is expensive, that students are taking on unmanageable debt and that they too often graduate unprepared for the world of work. In contrast, many economists and educators point to data showing that the fastest growing job categories require at least a college degree.
FEATURES
By Dr. Modena Wilson and Dr. Alain Joffe and Dr. Modena Wilson and Dr. Alain Joffe,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | February 11, 1997
My 8-year-old daughter has been coughing up blood. Otherwise, she seems fine.How worried should I be about this?Coughing up blood (called hemoptysis by doctors) should always be taken seriously.It is an unusual symptom in childhood. When it does occur, it may be a sign of a lung disease that requires treatment.Before listing some of the most common causes of hemoptysis during childhood, we want to point out that it is not always easy to tell whether the blood is coming from the lungs or the stomach, but both are important.
FEATURES
By Phyllis Brill and Phyllis Brill,Evening Sun Staff | November 13, 1990
WHAT DOES it mean when you hear that a dear friend has had a heart attack and is in the hospital in critical condition? Just how bad is critical? You might call the hospital the next day and be told his condition is stable. Does that mean he is out of danger now?Perhaps you read about an accident on I-95 in which three local teen-agers are hurt. The paper says one of the passengers was hospitalized in critical condition. The next day you read that the teen's condition is guarded. Does that mean he is getting better or worse?
NEWS
By Gilbert Sandler | July 18, 1995
WHEN IT comes to news reporting, the old city-room edict is always: first, get the story; and second, get it right. When the writer gets it wrong, it's a mess. It gets the reader who knows better all upset, confuses history and puts an error in the record books. I know; I've had my share of errors.Recently, the New York Times, which is known for its excellence, included what some of us around Baltimore consider a glaring error. On Sunday, July 9, the Times published an article about Baltimore in its travel section, called "What's Doing in Baltimore," by writer Melinda Henneberger.
NEWS
By Meredith Cohn and Meredith Cohn,meredith.cohn@baltsun.com | February 2, 2009
It's cold outside. And as people shovel snow, scrape car windows or just spend time in the frigid air, some find that their hands and feet become numb or painful. Better get indoors or warm up, because this could mean frostbite or, more likely, frostnip, says Dr. John Wogan, attending physician in the Department of Emergency Medicine at Greater Baltimore Medical Center. What is frostbite? Frostbite is what happens when exposure to severe cold temperatures reduces blood flow and causes ice-crystals to form inside body tissues, leading to serious, even irreversible, damage.
BUSINESS
March 20, 2005
Q. I am 55 years old and thinking about retiring in a year or two. Would my early retirement affect how much I receive from Social Security after I elect to take regular benefits at age 65? - B.S.K., Chicago A. Based on the way Social Security benefits are calculated and paid, you and many others should carefully reconsider your decision to retire early. Here's why. The monthly benefits you receive from Social Security depend on your average earnings over the best 35 years in your work history.
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