Where are Graham, Johnson?To Ravens coach Brian Billick:I...

Letters

November 07, 1999

Where are Graham, Johnson?

To Ravens coach Brian Billick:

I am a frustrated season-ticket holder. I understand all the statements to the effect that the Ravens just don't have enough offensive weapons. However, as for the weapons you do have:

Why won't you use running back Jay Graham (a second-round draft choice) in some situations? He has outstanding speed and explosion. It would seem that a coach of your imagination would find a way to get something out of your other backs. This is not a put-down of Errict Rhett, who is having a decent year, but what's wrong with a fresh back in certain situations?

What is the problem with Patrick Johnson (another second-round pick)? How in the world can you not dress a player who may be one of the fastest people on the planet? His presence would spread the defense and open up routes underneath, regardless of his propensity to drop passes.

Unless there are injuries I am not aware of, these are personnel decisions, along with Scott Mitchell, Michael Jackson and having no draft picks in the second and third rounds last April, that I just don't understand.

A. Dwight Pettit

Baltimore

Respect fans' choices

I was awed as I read the sports section on Nov. 2, in which Ravens coach Brian Billick questions how the Ravens will be treated by the refrees in Cleveland. The officials are there to do a job, and Billick can challenge their calls if he disagrees.

I could understand Art Modell having a problem going to Cleveland, as he misled the fans who supported him and the Browns for 34 years.

I pray the Cleveland fans refrain from treating the Ravens' fans the way we were treated when we attended a game in Baltimore. My family and I were shocked to see Cleveland fans spit on, food thrown on them and obscenities screamed in their faces.

Both sides should realize there will be fans for both teams at all games and it is all about respect of choice and the right to that choice without feeling threatened.

Mark Schabel

Laurel

Rose is not second-class

Sun columnist John Eisenberg's article of Oct. 25 states that Pete Rose should be in baseball's Hall of Fame, because "the Hall is a place for baseball's greatest players, regardless of their level of citizenship," but that Rose is "a serious gambler who has no place in baseball."

This puts Eisenberg in the same category as NBC sports reporter Jim Gray, who relentlessly questioned Rose about gambling before Game 2 of the World Series.

An ABC affiliate in New York received more than 600 complaints about Gray's insistence on discussing Rose's alleged gambling on baseball games, on a day reserved for honoring baseball's greatest players of the century.

You can bet there were thousands more throughout the country who were disgusted with Gray's lack of good taste and his attempt to demean the character of a truly great baseball player, whose only vice was his hobby of playing the horses and allegedly betting on baseball games in which he was not a participant.

If such activities make a person a second-class citizen, then this country has very few good citizens.

Benjamin Millman

Baltimore

Firing Wren a big mistake

To Peter Angelos:

Do fans of the Orioles one favor: sell the team. I am not currently a season-ticket holder and, frankly, I never will be under your regime. Firing general manager Frank Wren was yet another blemish that you have inflicted on this team with your dictator style of ownership.

Manager Ray Miller's firing was a foregone conclusion and long overdue, but Wren? In my estimation, firing Wren was the pitiful climax of a series of terrible decisions that have been made with you as owner of this team.

Wren was quickly hired as Atlanta's assistant GM, and Braves GM John Schuerholz said, "I can't imagine anyone bringing more qualifications to fill this position than Frank Wren."

The Orioles will never know, that's for sure.

Aaron L. Stansbury Jr.

Baltimore

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