Terps get ACC to review call on Jordan's romp

MARYLAND NOTEBOOK

Hold negates 61-yard run to 1

Timmins speaks up

November 03, 1999|By Bill Free | Bill Free,SUN STAFF

COLLEGE PARK -- The coordinator of Atlantic Coast Conference officials, Tommy Hunt, is still reviewing a 10-yard holding penalty against Maryland tight end John Waerig that played a major role in Saturday's 25-22 loss to Duke.

"I've talked to Tommy Hunt and he's reviewing the tape," Maryland coach Ron Vanderlinden said yesterday of the call, which nullified a 61-yard run by LaMont Jordan to the Blue Devils' 1-foot line early in the fourth quarter. "And I've also put in a call to the ACC commissioner [John Swofford]. It's a matter they're handling internally."

Vanderlinden said Waerig "threw a sensational block on the play. It was so dominating. John just reached out and knocked the guy down. It's so frustrating when you see a crunching block like that on a 61-yard run and it comes back."

Waerig said he was amazed when he found out the call was against him.

"I've been blocking like that all year and I've never been called for a hold," he said. "I was blocking inside the frame. We ran the same play over and over all day long and it was working. I guess they called the hold because the guy fell down when I blocked him."

It was one of 10 "knockdowns" for Waerig in the game.

The Terps bounced back from the ill-fated call to drive to the 10-yard line but they never did reach the end zone for what would have been a 26-17 lead with less than 10 minutes left in the game.

Instead of a touchdown, Maryland had to settle for a 28-yard Brian Kopka field goal for a 22-17 lead. The four lost points were the difference in the game.

Kopka was forced to kick the field goal after backup tailback Mookie Sikyala was thrown for a 2-yard loss on a third-and-one rush up the middle.

Sikyala was in the game because Jordan was still winded from a 32-yard run three plays before the crucial third-down situation. The 32-yard run came just four plays after Jordan's 61-yard jaunt that was whistled back.

However, Vanderlinden absolved Sikyala of any blame yesterday for the 2-yard loss.

"I should have called timeout on that play and given us a chance," he said. "I take full responsibility. I knew there was confusion on the play and I watched the whole thing happen. We tried to signal in a change of venue, but it wasn't communicated properly."

Timmins talks `talk'

Senior team captain Peter Timmins held an impromptu players' team meeting in the locker room Monday and as usual did all the talking in an emotional manner.

"Look guys," Timmins said, according to teammates. "I want my jewelry, I want my rings, I want everything we can get from going to a bowl game.

"Who's with me? If you want to win, stay here. If you want to lose, you can leave. This is serious football here. This is enough lip service. It's time to go out and play and practice like you want to win. If you want to win, let's go to the game and take victory."

Kopka said Timmins "really got us riled up. He's an emotional kid. He won't tell you what you want to hear. He'll tell you like it is. He's good for us."

Kopka and Terps linebacker Marlon Moore both said, "Peter is the perfect team captain for us. He complements some of our other captains like Jamie Wu and Brad Messina who do a good job of getting the offense worked up."

Jackson return doubtful

It is looking more and more as if junior strong safety Tony Jackson (Wilde Lake) will not play any more this season because of a broken left ankle he suffered in the season opener.

That means he will be eligible to receive a medical hardship redshirt from the NCAA this season, giving him two more years of eligibility.

If Jackson would appear in any one of the last three games just for one play, he could not receive a medical hardship and it would cost him a full season's eligibility.

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