Pasadena man dies after crash

his car struck SUV late Sunday

Police say speed, alcohol may have been factors

November 03, 1999|By TaNoah Morgan | TaNoah Morgan,SUN STAFF

Speed and alcohol are believed to have been factors in a head-on crash that resulted in the death Monday of a Pasadena man, county police said yesterday.

Sean Allan Krick, 20, was flown to the Maryland Shock Trauma Center with head and chest injuries after his 1990 Honda Civic skidded across the center line on Baltimore-Annapolis Boulevard near Waterford Road and slammed into a sport utility vehicle shortly before midnight Sunday.

Krick of the 800 block of Deering Road was pronounced dead shortly after 7 a.m. Monday. Police were awaiting toxicology reports from an autopsy, but said that officers noticed a smell of alcohol in the wreckage of his vehicle.

According to police, Krick was exceeding the 40 mph speed limit and failed to negotiate a sharp curve. His car collided with a 1997 Isuzu Rodeo driven by Melissa Jannife Moore, 18, of the 8200 block of Old Mill Road in Pasadena. She was released after treatment at North Arundel Hospital.

Police said Krick was not using a seat belt. According to court records, he paid a fine this year for failure to use a seat belt, and was found guilty of speeding after being stopped a year ago on Route 10, clocked at 92 mph by police.

Krick lived the past two years with his grandmother, Patricia Valley, who said yesterday she did not know where he had gone after leaving the house after 10: 30 p.m. Sunday.

She said that Krick, who had attended Glen Burnie High School, was a Wal-Mart stock clerk until he started a job at Bono's Pizzeria on Mountain Road a few months ago. She said he had been looking forward to being a godfather and uncle to a baby boy his younger sister is expecting next week.

"He was really looking forward to taking care of the baby," Valley said. "She's decided now she's going to name the baby Sean."

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