Silly stories to create at home

Activity

October 31, 1999

Get as silly as you like with these simple-to-make books.

What you need

* child's favorite storybook

* variety of magazines with lots of photographs

* 8 1/2 -by-11-inch sheets of construction paper

* child scissors

* nontoxic white glue

* 6 large interlocking metal rings

* black washable marker

* hole puncher

What to do together

1. Read your child's storybook together. Then, in preparation for making the flip books, discuss the book in terms of who (people or animal characters), what (activities or events), and where (places). Then explain to your child how you will use this concept to make a silly flip story.

2. Gather the magazines and other supplies. On separate sheets of construction paper, which will be your book covers, help your child write "Who," "What" and "Where."

3. Search through magazines to find colorful pictures that fall into each category: for example, who (puppy, baby); what (eating a plate of spaghetti, driving a car, climbing a tree); where (laundromat, inside a house or on a boat). Help your child cut out the pictures and glue each one to a sheet of construction paper. Have your child punch two holes in the same place on the left side of each page.

4. Sort pictures into the categories of the flip-book titles. Assemble the books and fasten them with the rings.

5. Now the fun begins! Place the three books next to each other. First, with your eyes closed, flip through the "Who" pages. Then stop! Do the same for the "What" and "Where" pages. Then read across. For example, "The puppy ate a plate of spaghetti in the laundromat."

6. Add pictures to your booklets until you have a giant silly story.

Your child will learn to:

* identify parts of a story

* enhance his sense of humor

* develop classification skills

* strengthen hand-eye coordination

-- Scholastic Parent and Child Magazine October/November 1998

Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.