History in the making

HOME FRONT

October 31, 1999|By Karol V. Menzie | Karol V. Menzie,Sun Staff

Jewelry, decorative art, furniture, textiles, paintings and miniatures, folk art, glassware, and political memorabilia are just some of the items that will be offered by nearly three dozen dealers at this year's Maryland Historical Society Antiques Show this coming weekend.

With the theme of "A Certain Elegance," the show begins with a gala preview party from 6 p.m. to 9 p.m. Thursday, and features a lecture and luncheon from 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. Friday with costume jewelry designer Kenneth Jay Lane (whose clients have included Jacqueline Kennedy Onassis, Audrey Hepburn and Wallis Warfield Simpson, the Baltimore-bred Duchess of Windsor). There are also walking tours of the Mount Vernon neighborhood at 9:30 a.m. and 10:30 a.m. Friday, and 11 a.m. and 2 p.m. Saturday.

The museum's recent expansion allows the show, for only the second time, to be held at the historical society, and gives visitors and shoppers a chance to see show antiques in the context of the museum's collections.

Show hours are 11 a.m. to 8 p.m. Friday, 11 a.m. to 6 p.m. Saturday, and 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. Sunday. Daily admission is $8 for members, $10 for nonmembers. Valet parking is available and there will be a free trolley service from the Inner Harbor to the museum throughout the weekend. Tickets to the gala are $100 (reservations required); tickets to the Lane lecture and lunch are $50 (reservations required). The Maryland Historical Society is at 201 W. Monument St. in downtown Baltimore. For reservations or information, call 410-685-3750, Ext. 321.

The 'ultimate' catalog for refined tastes

For those who value fine bed linens -- especially those in silk, Egyptian cotton, linen and cashmere -- there's a new catalog from Hanover Direct, "Turiya" (from the Sanskrit term for "ultimate harmony"). Besides linens, there are pillows, sleepware, and bath and bedroom accessories, and Scandia Down duvets and feather beds.

There are sheets with 600-per-inch thread counts (180 to 200 is standard; $275 for a queen flat sheet), hand-dyed velvet throw pillows ($340 to $575), and merino lambs-wool shearling texture blankets ($1,265 for queen) and pillow shams ($435 each for European squares), and mother-of-pearl-accented bath accessories ($80 for a square tissue box, $30 for a tumbler).

Turiya also offers furniture, including the Provence sleigh bed in cherry ($2,900 queen). Shipping is complimentary. For more information or a catalog, call 800-245-1044, or check out the Web site at turiya.com.

EVENTS:

* Homewood House Museum, on the campus of Johns Hopkins University, will offer a workshop in the "fancy" painted finishes of the 18th and 19th centuries, such as faux marble and faux graining, from 1 p.m. to 4 p.m. Saturday, Nov. 13. The workshop will be taught by artists Mary Plumer and Rosanna Moore, whose work graces a number of Maryland historical properties. Paints, materials and light refreshments will be provided. Admission is $22 for members, $25 for nonmembers. Reservations are required: Send a check to Homewood House Museum, 3400 N. Charles St., Baltimore, Md. 21218, or call 410-516-5589.

* More than three dozen artists, craftspeople and specialty shops will be represented at the annual Mistletoe Mart at Ascension Episcopal Church, 23 N. Court St., Westminster. The vendors will be selling stained glass, woodworking, pottery, jewelry, dolls, herbal gifts and home accessories. Mart hours are 10 a.m. to 9 p.m. Thursday and Friday., and 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. Saturday. Admission is $2 for adults, $1 for children. Refreshments will be sold. For more information, call 410-848-3251. --K.M.

Home Front welcomes interesting home and garden news. Please send suggestions to Karol V. Menzie, Home Front, The Sun, 501 N. Calvert St., Baltimore, Md. 21278, or fax to 410-783-2519. Information must be received at least four weeks in advance to be considered.

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