Democrats gather for show of solidarity

Congressional leaders announce support for Baltimore candidates

October 16, 1999|By Ivan Penn | Ivan Penn,SUN STAFF

In a show of Democratic solidarity, four congressional leaders announced their support yesterday for their party's nominees for mayor, City Council president and comptroller -- a political trio they dubbed "Team Baltimore."

"Baltimore is the home of many great teams," said Sen. Barbara A. Mikulski, standing with mayoral nominee Martin O'Malley, council president nominee Sheila Dixon and Comptroller Joan M. Pratt. "We have the Orioles. We have the Ravens. And here we have Team Baltimore."

Business park plan

Mikulski joined Sen. Paul S. Sarbanes and U.S. Reps. Elijah E. Cummings and Benjamin L. Cardin in an endorsement ceremony at the former Exxon petroleum distribution facility at the northeast corner of South Conkling and Boston streets in Canton -- a site also known as the "tank farm."

The old distribution facility is a proposed site for the Chesapeake Business Center, which would be the first industrial park built in Baltimore in 20 years.

If the project is successful, the 1.5 million-square-foot industrial park is expected to generate 1,400 jobs over 10 years and produce $1.2 million a year in property taxes.

Attracting attention

The four congressional officials held the endorsement ceremony at the site as a way to show their united effort to attract federal dollars for the proposed industrial park and their commitment to working with their party's nominees if they win the Nov. 2 general election.

"We're going to use the resources of the federal government to recycle old, dirty brownfield land," Mikulski said.

Added Sarbanes: "We think there's going to be a great opportunity to take the city forward."

Vying for votes

Republican challengers continue to battle for voters in both the mayoral and council president races.

Dixon's challenger in the council president's race, Antonio Campbell, held a news conference yesterday outside City Hall in which he said he supported a zero-tolerance policy to combat crime.

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