Edward J. McKee, 84, artist for Baltimore Sun Co.Edward J...

October 15, 1999

Edward J. McKee, 84, artist for Baltimore Sun Co.

Edward J. McKee, a retired Baltimore Sun Co. artist, died Monday of heart failure at Good Samaritan Hospital. The 50-year Hamilton resident was 84.

Known as "Mac," he joined The Sunday Sun in 1949 and later headed the universal art department, which served The Sun, The Evening Sun and Sunday Sun, from 1974 until 1979 when the unit was dissolved.

He spent the last five years of his career as an artist for The Evening Sun, retouching photographs and producing graphics and illustrations for news stories. He retired in 1984.

"Ed was an original, hard-working, old-fashioned news artist, who did anything that was thrown at him and then some. Newspapering to him was a lot of fun, and he had a great friendly spirit," said Ernest F. Imhoff, retired assistant managing editor of The Evening Sun and The Sun.

The Baltimore native was a graduate of the Maryland Institute, College of Art, where he met Elean Rider, an artist, whom he married in 1945. During World War II, he served with the Army Signal Corps in Europe.

He was a 50-year communicant of St. Dominic Roman Catholic Church, Harford Road and Gibbons Avenue, where a Mass of Christian burial was offered yesterday.

In addition to his wife, he is survived by two sons, Thomas R. McKee of Hampton, Va., and Charles E. McKee of Catonsville; five daughters, Marcia A. McKee of Homewood, Dolores J. McKee of Hamilton, Audrey M. Johns of Rosedale, Alice K. Wilcox of Overlea and Rita L. Denbow of Carney; eight grandchildren; and five great-grandchildren.

Victor Harriman Poole, 80, engineer, hotel owner

Victor Harriman Poole, a retired civil engineer, died Monday of complications from a stroke at the health care center at Blakehurst Life Care Community in Towson. He was 80.

A former resident of Hampton in northern Baltimore County, he had lived at Blakehurst since 1993.

The registered professional engineer joined J. E. Greiner & Co. in Baltimore in 1946. He retired in 1977 and bought the Garland Motel in Dennis Port, Mass., which he operated until 1985.

The Govans native was a graduate of City College and earned his engineering degree from the Johns Hopkins University.

During World War II, he was a pilot-instructor with the Army Air Corps at Randolph Field, Texas.

His professional memberships included the American Society of Civil Engineers. He also belonged to the Baltimore Country Club.

He was a member of Trinity Episcopal Church in Towson, where a memorial service was held yesterday.

He is survived by his wife of 57 years, the former Virginia Brown; two sons, Donald R. Poole of Baltimore and Thomas Poole of Lutherville; a daughter, Patricia P. Kelley of Rockville; and eight grandchildren.

Helen Louise Cook, 93, educator, bookkeeper

Helen Louise Cook, a former educator and bookkeeper, died Monday of complications from a stroke at Brightwood Center in Brooklandville. The lifelong Monkton resident was 93.

For years, she was bookkeeper at Cook Lumber Co., now Cook Forest Products, in Jacksonville.

Her husband, F. Richard Cook, whom she married in 1942, is semiretired from the lumber business that was founded by his family in 1916.

The former Helen Louise McCauley, was born and raised on Garfield Avenue in Monkton, where her father was a telegrapher at the Northern Central Railroad's depot.

She earned a teaching degree from the State Normal School at Towson in 1925 and taught in the Baltimore County public school system until she retired in 1942.

For more than 80 years, she was a member of Monkton United Methodist Church.

Services will be held at 10 a.m. today at J. J. Hartenstein Mortuary, 24 Second St., New Freedom, Pa.

In addition to her husband, Mrs. Cook is survived by a daughter, Dixie L. Cook of Monkton.

James David Marks, 85, owner of printing company

James David Marks, former owner and president of a commercial printing company, died Monday of complications from a stroke at Oak Crest Village retirement community in Parkville. He was 85.

A former resident of Northwood and Owings Mills, he was owner and president of Colony Press Printing Co. in East Baltimore from 1955 until 1986 when he sold the business and retired.

Earlier, he had worked for a Baltimore advertising firm and taught marketing at the University of Baltimore in the early 1950s.

Born in Forest Park, he was educated in city public schools and later earned a General Education Development Certificate. He served in the Army during World War II.

He was a former president and coach of Northwood Little League and was active in the Serra Foundation.

A memorial Mass was offered yesterday .

He is survived by his wife of 59 years, the former Katherine Dietor.

Joseph N. Skinner Sr., 71, horse trainer, veteran

Joseph N. Skinner Sr., a retired thoroughbred horse trainer and former Ellicott City resident, died Monday of cancer at a hospital in Tampa, Fla. He was 71.

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