Medal of Honor

Cedar Creek : A Remembrance

October 10, 1999

These five men who served during the Civil War won the Medal of Honor twice:

Thomas W. Custer, 2nd lieutenant, Company B, 6th Michigan Cavalry, received the Medal of Honor for action at Namozine Church, Va., April 3, 1865, where he took about a dozen Confederate prisoners and their regiment's colors; the second award was for action at Sayler's Creek, Va., April 6, 1865, where he was wounded capturing the colors of another Confederate regiment.

Frank D. Baldwin, captain, Company D, 19th Michigan Infantry, was decorated for action July 12, 1864, at Peach Tree Creek, Ga., where he entered the Confederate line and captured two officers and a Georgia regiment's guidon; for his second award he was a 1st lieutenant, 5th U.S. Infantry, Nov. 8, 1874, at McClellans Creek, Texas, when with two companies he attacked a superior number of Indians in a strong position to rescue two white girls, who would have been killed if Baldwin had delayed action until reinforcements arrived.

John Cooper, coxswain, USS Brooklyn, Aug. 5, 1864; during action against Confederate forts and gunboats and with the ram Tennessee during the Battle of Mobile Bay, Cooper manned his gun with courage while his ship was being raked with fire; on April 26, 1865, Cooper received the medal for rescuing a wounded man from certain death under artillery fire during the Mobile Campaign.

Patrick Mullen, boatswain's mate on the USS Wyandank; from Baltimore; decorated for action March 17, 1865, when he drove back the enemy with artillery at Mattox Creek, and May 1, 1865, as a boatswain's mate on the USS Don, for rescuing an officer who was drowning.

John Lafferty, fireman on the USS Wyalusing, decorated for efforts to destroy the ram Albemarle in Roanoke River, May 25, 1864; under the name John Laverty, he won a second medal as a first class fireman on the USS Alaska at Callao Bay, Peru, on Sept. 14, 1881.

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