'The Three Little Wolves and the Big Bad Pig'

STORY TIME

October 03, 1999|By Eugene Trivizas

Editor's note: An altered retelling of the traditional tale about the conflict between pig and wolf -- with a surprise ending.

Once upon a time, there were three cuddly little wolves with soft fur and fluffy tails who lived with their mother. The first was black, the second was gray, and the third was white.

One day their mother called the three little wolves around her and said, "My little children, it is time for you to go out into the world. Go and build a house for yourselves. But beware of the big bad pig."

Soon they met a kangaroo who was pushing a wheelbarrow full of red and yellow bricks. "Please, will you give us some of your bricks?" asked the three little wolves.

"Certainly," said the kangaroo, and she gave them lots of red and yellow bricks.

So the three little wolves built themselves a house of bricks.

The very next day the big bad pig came prowling down the road and saw the house of bricks that the little wolves had built. The three little wolves were playing croquet in the garden. When they saw the big bad pig coming, they ran inside the house and locked the door.

The pig knocked on the door and grunted, "Little wolves, little wolves, let me come in!"

"No, no, no," said the three little wolves. "Not by the hair on our chinny-chin-chins, we will not let you in, not for all the tea leaves in our china teapot!"

"Then I'll huff and I'll puff and I'll blow the house down!" said the pig.

So he huffed and he puffed and he puffed and he huffed, but the house didn't fall down.

But the pig wasn't called big and bad for nothing. He went and fetched his sledgehammer, and he knocked the house down.

The three little wolves only just managed to escape before the bricks crumbled, and they were very frightened indeed.

"We shall have to build a stronger house," they said. Just then they saw a beaver who was mixing concrete in a concrete mixer.

"Please, will you give us some of your concrete?" asked the three little wolves.

"Certainly" said the beaver, and he gave them buckets and buckets full of messy, slurry concrete.

No sooner had they finished than the big bad pig came prowling down the road and saw the house of concrete that the wolves had built.

The pig rang the bell and said, "Little frightened wolves, let me come in!"

"No, no, no," said the three little wolves. "By the hair on our chinny-chin-chins, we will not let you come in, not for all of the tea leaves in our china teapot."

"Then and I'll huff and I'll puff and I'll blow your house down!" said the pig.

So he huffed and he puffed and he puffed and he huffed, but the house didn't fall down.

But the pig wasn't called big and bad for nothing. He went and fetched his pneumatic drill and smashed the house down.

The three little wolves managed to escape, but their chinny-chin-chins were trembling and trembling and trembling.

"Something must be wrong with our building materials," they said. "We have to try something different. "But what?"

At that moment they saw a flamingo coming along pushing a wheelbarrow full of flowers.

"Please, will you give us some flowers?" asked the little wolves.

"With pleasure," said the flamingo, and he gave them lots of flowers. So the three little wolves built a house of flowers.

Next day the big bad pig came prowling down the road and saw the house of flowers that the three little wolves had built.

He rang the bluebell at the door and said, "Little frightened wolves, let me come on in!"

"No, no, no," said the three little wolves. "By the hair on our chinny-chin-chins, we will not let you come in, not for all of the tea leaves in our china teapot!"

"Then I'll huff and I'll puff and I'll blow your house down!" said the pig.

But as he took a deep breath, ready to huff and puff, he smelled the soft scent of the flowers. It was fantastic. And because the scent was so lovely, the pig took another breath and then another. Instead of huffing and puffing, he began to sniff.

He sniffed deeper and deeper until he was quite filled with the fragrant scent. His heart grew tender, and he realized how horrible he had been. Right then he decided to become a big good pig.

He started to sing and dance the tarantella.

Excerpted from the book THE THREE LITTLE WOLVES AND THE BIG BAD PIG, text by Eugene Trivizas and illustrated by Helen Oxenbury. Text copyright c 1993 by Eugene Trivizas; illustrations copyright c 1993 by Helen Oxenbury. Reprinted by permission of Margaret K. McElderry Books, an imprint of Simon & Schuster, Inc., Children's Publishing Division. Originally published in the U.K. by Egmont Children's Books, Ltd. All rights reserved.

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