Well-seasoned clothes Need a Halloween costume? Or...

STYLE FILE

September 26, 1999|By Gailor Large | Gailor Large,SPECIAL TO THE SUN

Well-seasoned clothes

Need a Halloween costume? Or how about a wedding dress? You'll find both at Vintage Rose, a funky second-hand boutique at 14 1/2 E. Hamilton St. downtown. Originally located on Main Street in Ellicott City, the tiny shop is packed with one-of-a-kind vintage-wear, much of which is handmade.

Owner Pam Sehorn is a die-hard secondhand shopper herself, who worked as a bartender and caterer before she opened her own store. She says that some of her merchandise is from the turn of the century, although two of our favorite items, a pair of tapestry-style bell bottoms ($34) and a metallic gold and silver top ($8), only date to the '60s.

Sehorn moved her shop to Baltimore earlier this month.

"It was time for a change," she says. "I have a wide variety of things, and there are such a wide variety of people here. I've already sold things that sat forever in Ellicott City."

Vintage Rose is open from 11 a.m. to 7 p.m. Monday through Saturday.

Suitable style

The death of the suit: fact or fiction? While business fashion is undoubtedly becoming more versatile, the suit is far from gone. (Pictured below is one by Jones & Co. from Hecht's.)

The most modern suit is the pantsuit. Here are its primary features:

* Fitted, soft-shouldered jacket

* Long, straight-leg pants

* Mini-turtle collar

* Zipped front

-- G.L.

Cuff love

Cuff-style accessories are grabbing attention all over.

Encircle a bare wrist with an Indian-beaded bracelet (below), accentuate a low neckline with Marie-Helene de Taillac's crystal choker, sweep long locks off the shoulders with Frederic Fekkai's ponytail cuff (above), or show off the upper arm with Nikki B's beaded bracelets worn between the shoulder and elbow.

Fancy, funky or flirty, cuffs come in enough styles and shapes to satisfy every fashion appetite. -- G.L.

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