Rosenthal wrong on Williams The Sept. 11 sports page...

Letters

September 19, 1999

Rosenthal wrong on Williams

The Sept. 11 sports page gave a good indication of the different writers The Sun employs.

Two articles about the University of Maryland were side by side. Bill Free wrote a positive story about a local football player at Maryland. Ken "Mr. Negative" Rosenthal took his usual doom-and-gloom approach to sports in general and for the second time took a shot at Gary Williams over the Tamir Goodman situation.

Rosenthal, as usual, just doesn't get it. Williams realized his mistake in time for Goodman to have a good senior year and find another college. There is no way any major college can accept Goodman's stance.

Rosenthal should get a life and join the real world.

John C. Clarke Sr., Abingdon

The preseason warriors

Take heart, Ravens fans. Do not despair. Preseason for the year 2000 begins in a mere 11 months.

Next summer, DeRon Jenkins will once again stay within 10 yards of the receiver he's assigned to cover. Scott Mitchell will play a promising quarter, recovering all of his fumbles. Matt Stover will convert field goals up to 35 yards in length. The team won't be penalized at the most ill-advised times. The "Who Cares About the Regular Season?" Ravens will be 4-0 and flying high.

Playing pathetically from September through December doesn't matter in the least. This team cannot be stopped in August. It's on an eight-game preseason winning streak and counting.

Morton D. Marcus, Baltimore

Woodson finds time for fans

On Aug. 22, my family and I went to Six Flags America in Largo. We were on our way out of the park when I noticed Ravens safety Rod Woodson entering it.

My wife, son, stepson and I approached him and his children. I introduced myself and asked for his autograph. He asked if I had a pen and I said, "No." He talked to me about the Ravens for a while and then we left.

As we were walking away, I asked my wife and kids if they wanted to take a photograph with Woodson. My wife approached him again with the two boys and asked if he would pose with them for a photo. He said OK.

This was the highlight of a long day for my boys. Woodson went out of his way to accommodate us. It's refreshing to meet an athlete who has time for his fans.

Ronald Kutchey, Odenton

Hey, umps, quit whining

A dictionary could use the recent actions of some members of the umpires union as an excellent example in its definition of the word "arrogance."

If memory serves, all we heard from the umpires at the beginning of this season was "zero tolerance." But then they resigned, and their resignations were accepted. Period.

If I broke a contract with my employer by resigning and a day or so later said, "Uh-oh, that was a stupid move, I've changed my mind," I doubt very seriously that my employer would take me back, let alone offer to pay my salary for the rest of the the year plus a bonus.

Give me a break. The umps should stop whining and take it like men.

Lois Dulin, Towson

Alomar gave up on O's

How bittersweet it was to watch Roberto Alomar play like a phenom recently against the Orioles, when last season he was sleepwalking through each game.

I thought professionals always gave 100 percent even if the outcome would be less than hoped for. If Alomar had given even 90 percent, the Orioles might have been a better team.

Mr. Alomar, we fans supported you during the rough times. When we counted on you, you chose not to support us and ran to Cleveland. Now you are playing inspired baseball once again. Too bad loyalty doesn't go both ways.

Catherine B. Knight, Perry Hall

Thanks for old-timer update

I would like to thank John Steadman for last Sunday's column, especially his mention of one of my boyhood heroes, Gene Woodling.

My get-well card to Woodling is already in the mail. I wish that the other writers would keep the readers up to date on more of our older favorite athletes.

Jim Batton Elkridge

Pub Date: 9/19/99

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