Police Blotter is a sampling of crimes in Baltimore City...

Police Blotter

August 31, 1999|By Richard Irwin

Police Blotter is a sampling of crimes in Baltimore City and Baltimore County.

Baltimore City

Stabbing: A man, 19, who was stabbed in the abdomen in the 800 block of N. Wolfe St. about 5: 30 p.m. Sunday was in stable condition yesterday at Johns Hopkins Hospital. Police recovered a quantity of marijuana from one of the man's pockets, and drug charges were pending.

Burglary: A female pit bull terrier and its food were stolen Sunday from an enclosed porch of a house in the 200 block of S. Augusta Ave.

Theft: L uggage, compact discs, a wallet containing an undisclosed sum of cash and other property, all valued at more than $3,500, were stolen Sunday from a 1998 Mazda parked in an alley in the 2100 block of N. Charles St. Property valued at $900 was recovered nearby.

Baltimore County

Towson Precinct

Carjacking: A woman was vacuuming her 1999 Volvo station wagon at the Woodbrook Exxon Service Center in the 6200 block of N. Charles St. about noon Sunday when a man shoved her into the front passenger seat and ordered her to lie down and stay quiet. As he drove away, she jumped from the car, leaving her purse and a cellular phone. The car, with tags 046-BFM, was last seen heading south on Charles Street.

Cockeysville Precinct

Burglary: Two computers, a videocassette recorder and 90 video discs, all valued at more than $7,000, were stolen Sunday from a house in the 800 block of W. Padonia Road.

Woodlawn Precinct

Stolen car found: A 1993 Dodge Dynasty with tags DHL 479 stolen May 31 in the 100 block of S. Kossuth St. in Southwest Baltimore was recovered Sunday in the first block of Kafern Drive.

Theft/arrests: Two teen-age girls were released to their parents Sunday after they tried to steal clothing valued at nearly $200 from the Value City store in the 5800 block of Baltimore National Pike. Theft charges were pending.

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