Man agent shot is in critical condition

Secret Service reassigns official

police investigate

July 24, 1999|By Peter Hermann | Peter Hermann,SUN STAFF

A man shot by an off-duty U.S. Secret Service agent near Baltimore's Inner Harbor Thursday night remained stable in critical condition yesterday as city police continued to investigate the incident.

Special Agent Francis E. Peckay, 38, of Catonsville, was assigned to administrative duties, a routine move, pending the outcome of the investigation, said Secret Service spokesman Jim Mackin.

Police said last night that they had identified the wounded man as Levon Outlaw, 29, of the 700 block of McCabe Ave. in Govans.

He suffered several wounds to the upper body and was in critical but stable condition at Maryland Shock Trauma Center.

The incident occurred about 8: 45 p.m. on Concord Street, between East Pratt and East Lombard streets, across from the Columbus Center.

Police said Peckay had just parked his Jeep Cherokee when a gunman approached the passenger-side door and demanded money from the agent's brother-in-law, Leon Webber, 40, of New York.

Police said Webber handed over $20.

Agent Angelique Cook-Hayes, a city police spokeswoman, said the gunman then walked around the car and pointed the weapon at Peckay.

She said the Secret Service agent, still sitting in his car, took out his handgun and shot the man several times.

The wounded man ran several blocks and collapsed at Shot Tower Park, across the street from Police Headquarters at East Fayette and President streets. Police said he had been struck several times in the upper body.

Authorities said they retrieved the suspect's weapon, but could offer no information on what type it was.

They said the results of the investigation will be turned over to the city state's attorney's office, which will determine whether the shooting was justified.

Peckay could not be reached for comment yesterday.

Pub Date: 7/24/99

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