Man leaving nightclub shot in spine

Paradox owners had said Sunday dances were over

July 06, 1999|By Tom Pelton | Tom Pelton,SUN STAFF

Despite telling the public the club had canceled violence-prone Sunday night dance parties, the owners of Paradox nightclub near PSINet Stadium held another event Sunday, after which a patron was shot in the spine walking to his car.

Two young men were returning from the club to their car parked in Lot B-1 of Orioles Park at Camden Yards on Russell Street when someone fired four or five shots at them about 2: 15 a.m., police said.

One of the bullets hit Jason Baker, 18, of the 1900 block of Summit Ave. in Baltimore County, in the back, police said.

Baker was in serious and stable condition at the Maryland Shock Trauma Center yesterday, according to a hospital spokeswoman.

Police are investigating whether a gunman fired the shots from a gold Toyota Camry that a witness saw speeding up a ramp of Martin Luther King Boulevard after the shooting, said Southern District Lt. Regis Flynn.

On April 6, an attorney for the nightclub told The Sun that Paradox was canceling its Sunday night dances after four people were shot near the Russell Street club the previous night.

Frank Boston III, attorney for the nightclub, said yesterday that he did not know why the club had reopened on a Sunday night.

"We didn't make a promise to anybody," Boston said. "After the last incident, my client decided he would stop the events. But whether it was a permanent stop or not, or whether this was a special holiday event, I don't know."

The quadruple shooting was the most recent in a string of troubles at the club. In March, an off-duty police officer from the Naval Academy working as a security guard at the club was grazed by a bullet outside. A female patron was shot and wounded last year while driving from the club last year. In June 1997, a Coppin State College student was slashed with a razor blade on the dance floor.

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