Recreation help comes via click

Federal Web site offers skinny on 1,900 sites

May 30, 1999|By Peter Baker | Peter Baker,SUN STAFF

Always wanted to fish, hunt or camp in a remote areas of the country, but didn't know where to start planning your trip?

An inter-agency Web site on the Internet, www.recreation.gov, can lead you to more than 1,900 recreation sites that are managed by eight different federal agencies.

"Recreation.gov is a great example of working together to provide better service to the public," said Bruce Babbitt, Secretary of the Interior.

"These lands are owned by every American. Serving the visiting public is exactly why recreation.gov was created."

The Web site includes national parks, forests and wildlife refuges, lakes, rivers, historic sites and other areas of interest, as well as links to online reservations for more than 50,000 campsites and facilities nationwide.

After accessing the Web site, choose an area of interest and click through a menu of federal lands in that part of the country. The menu also lists recreational activities available at each site, along with links to weather forecasts, digital maps and travel information.

Advice on fawns

The Department of Natural Resources cautions outdoorsmen to follow these steps if they encounter white-tailed deer fawns in the wild.

Never try to catch one.

If the fawn is hiding, admire it briefly and quietly walk away.

If a fawn tries to follow, gently push on its shoulders until it lies down and then walk away. The action will simulate what the doe does when she doesn't want a fawn to follow.

Fawns that are encountered alone in the woods probably have not been abandoned. Does hide their young to protect them and will return periodically to feed them.

In May and June, especially, when fawns are too young to outrun predators, natural camouflage and an absence of scent are the fawn's guarantees of safety.

It is illegal to remove deer from the wild without the permission of the Department of Natural Resources.

For more information on fawns or other young animals, contact the Wildlife and Heritage Division information line at 800-442-0708.

Pub Date: 5/30/99

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